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How Much Do Dog Walkers Make?

 

How much do dog walkers make? You hear the glamorous stories of famous dog walkers making upwards of $100K a year, but is that normal? Those folks are definitely unusual, but how much dog walkers make depends on a lot of factors.

Region

Dog walkers in big cities can make a lot of money catering to the rich and famous. Then again, these folks often have personal staff that take care of their dogs and do not need dog walkers. Really to know how much dog walkers make you need to look at the normal areas, not the extremely rich in the big cities. It is true that the cost of living is higher in larger cities and thus dog walkers make more. In areas where there is a lower cost of living, how much dog walkers make will be lower.

Experience

A Professional Dog Walking Company will charge more and thus pay their dog walkers more than a neighbor’s kid. Plus employees of a dog walking company should be covered by insurance, get time off and other perks. As a client, with a professional dog walking company you gain experience, animal expertise, a back up plan for emergencies and a generally higher level of professionalism. You pay more, but it is typically worth it.

Group of dog walkers

Group vs Individual Dog Walk

You see a lot of pictures of one person walking a group of 15 dogs. While this does happen, the normal case is much less glamorous. Most dog walkers only walks dog together from the same household, so only 1-2 at a time. Individual walks tend to be from 15 minutes to 1 hour in length, so through the course of an afternoon a dog walker could work with up to 8 household, depending on the time and length of the walks. Many people want mid-day dog walks, which limits the amount of visits a dog walker can take on.

For group walks, there is a lot of time invested in the pick up and drop off of the dogs. The walks tend to be longer so the dog walker may only take out one group per day. In both individual and group dog walks, how much the dog walker makes will depend on the number of walks and dogs in the group.

Overall

So really, how much do dog walkers make? This can vary greatly but generally falls in the range of $10-25 an hour. If you are curious how much our dog walkers make, you can read up on our Hiring Guide. There are many ways to structure being a dog walker but in most cases it will be a fun job that you can enjoy, pay is ok and you can get out and enjoy the sunshine!

Make the Perfect Dog Walk Schedule!

 

If you are hiring a dog walker then one of your biggest questions may be: What Should My Dog Walk Schedule Be? Good question! It all depends on the needs of your dog and your schedule. We have example schedules so you can get some ideas for what might work for you. If you have never had a dog walker before, check out What is a Dog Walk Service?

When Do I Need a Dog Walker?

These are ton of times when a dog walker can be very helpful in your life. Read up on 8 Times When You Need a Dog Walker. Whether you work all day, have a busy home schedule or just need a bit of extra help, a good Professional Dog Walker can make a huge difference in the life of you and your dog.

What to Consider When Making a Dog Walk Schedule

There are many factor when picking the perfect dog walk schedule. You need to find a schedule, and thus a dog walker, that can match the schedule you need.

Factors to consider:

  • How long are you gone during the day? If you are gone for 8 hours maybe your pup is ok with one walk during the middle of the day, but if you are gone for 12 hours then you could increase that to 2 dog walks.
  • Are your dog walks dependent on a specific time, like breakfast, dinner or halfway through the day, or just to get your dog some extra exercise?
  • How old is your pup? Puppies need potty breaks a lot more often than adult dogs. A good rule of thumb is puppies can only last an hour per every month of age (2 hours for a 2 month old, 3 hours for a 3 month old, etc). This can vary greatly depending on the breed, history and personality of each puppy, but it is a good starting place. Lean more about the Benefits of Dog Walk for Puppies.
  • How much energy does your dog have? A mellow Cocker Spaniel is going to have very different exercise needs from a high strung Border Collie.
  • How often does your dog need to go outside? Some dogs can last long periods of time, but others need a potty break every few hours due to age or medical reasons.
  • What time of day is best for her to be out on a walk? If it is really hot or cold during the day then you will want to take that into account. Some dogs are also more active during specific times of day, so it you are trying to burn off energy, then you are best off
  • Will she need to be fed during this visit? If so, then you will need to arrange the visits at a normal feeding time and allow time in the visit.
  • Do you want visits regularly or just occasionally? If you only need an occasional visit then you can customize each day as it comes up. If you believe you will need a regular schedule, then consider setting up a dog walk schedule that will work all of the time, and tweak it if some days are different than others.

woman walking dog on leash, dog walk schedule

Dog Walk Schedule #1

1 Hour Dog Walk

A one hour dog walk allows for a long walk. This can be good if you dog needs a break during the middle of your work day or just needs a fair bit of exercise. One hour walks are popular with people who are working long shifts or who have high energy dogs. Your dog can also be fed during this time, or at least given a snack. Your dog walker can clean out water bowls and make sure you pup is set until you get home.

 

Dog Walk Schedule #2

Two 30 Minute Dog Walks

If you are gone for a long shift, or have a dog that needs to go out every few hours, consider doing two shorter visits. This will allow your dog to get a couple times and stay active. If you are home but busy, you can time these visits at meal time and your dog walker can also feed your dog breakfast and dinner.

 

Dog Walk Schedule #3

Two 15 Minute Dog Walks

If your dog just needs quick potty breaks but not a lot of exercise, then you may be able to do two 15 minute dog walks. 15 minute walks are short, so they are really not intended to burn off a lot of energy, just give a break during the day.

 

Dog Walk Schedule #4

30 Minute Dog Walk

A 30 minute dog walk is a very typical dog walk schedule. For an adult dog that likes to get out, but does not have a ton of energy, this is a good length of walk. It also works for a high energy dog, if you exercise him at other times of the day.

 

Dog Walk Schedule #5

15 Minute Dog Walk

A quick 15 minute dog walk is used for dogs that just need a fast potty break and not much exercise.

dog running with ball for dog walk schedule

Some Real Life Examples

  1. When I am away for a day trip I have a dog walker come exercise my pup. He is high energy and is used to having someone at home, so I always schedule a 1 hour dog walk. This way he is not bouncing off the walls when I get back. Often the dog walker will both walk him and play with him in the yard, since he loves fetch. I pick a time around midway of the times I am going to be gone. If I am gone through dinner I will try to set a dog walk around that time so he can be fed as well, although I need to account for that because he cannot eat right after hard play, so he needs a break to cool off.
  2. A diabetic pug needed visits during the day. Because of her medication, she had to go out every 4 hours. She likes short walks, but also cuddle time, so she got 30 minute dog walk visits every 3-4 hours when her parent’s were not home. Some of that is a walk, but the rest is enjoying the nice grass and getting lots of cuddles. She also loves her carrots as an afternoon snack.
  3. A woman works as a nurse from 9am-9pm. Her two dogs like a long walk and need to be fed dinner, so she scheduled a 1 hour dinner dog walk around 4-6pm. The dog walker feeds the dogs dinner then takes them for a walk for the remaining time. They are nice and tired by the end!
  4. A woman is traveling for work and her husband cannot make it home during the day to let out their young Lab mix. When she is gone she schedules a daily 30 minute dog walk visits over lunchtime. The dog loves to play in the yard, so the dog walker plays fetch with the ball and frisbee and refills her water. When she is exhausted, the dog likes to lay in the dog walker’s lap for a few minutes before getting her afternoon snack.
  5. A nice couple have 2 young kids. The dogs are not getting out as much as they used to, so they schedule a 30 minute dog walk every night around dinner. The sitter comes and gets the dogs just during the busy dinner time, takes them for a nice walk and feeds them when she gets back. The couple gets to focus on the kids, while knowing the dogs are cared for and will be tired for the evening.
  6. An elderly woman has been moved to an assisted living facility. She is having trouble with her mobility, but the facility lets her bring her sweet Golden Retriever. The dog needs exercise and can be overwhelmed during physical therapy, so a dog walker comes during that time and takes him for a 45 minute walk. He gets some exercise and the woman gets her physical therapy without a stressed dog in the room.

Every situation is unique and all visits can be tailored to match the needs of your house. In all of these cases the dog walker was able to match the time, length of visit and tasks to the house in a way that benefited both the people and the dogs. A good dog walker is invaluable to your team!

 

Time to Customize!

These gave you some ideas for a dog walk schedule, but now you actually have to decide on the details.

  • How many dog walks do you want?
  • What time should they be at?
  • How long are they? (feel free to mix and match)
  • What happens during each dog walk?

Now you are ready to schedule your dog walks!

 

Still have questions or need ideas? Contact us to talk about your dog and we will walk you through the decision making process.

Dog Walk Training Ideas

 

Do you want to make the most of your dog walks? Bring some life to your normal dog walks by adding in some Dog Walk Training Sessions!

Why Add Dog Walk Training Sessions?

You are happy going on a normal walk. Why should you add in dog walk training sessions? Because there are so many benefits!

  • Be engaged. When I am out walking I see so many people on their phones, not paying attention to their dogs. Granted, the dogs may be sniffing around, but they would be having so much more fun if you were paying attention to them! It is great bonding time, so make the most of it.
  • Be aware. There are a lot of yummy things out there that your dog should not be eating. If you are working on dog walk training then you will quickly notice something out of the ordinary.
  • New tricks. This is the perfect opportunity to teach your dog new tricks, while you are already out and focused on your dog. The distractions will make sure your dog gets the trick down pat.
  • Have a better behaved dog. You see so many dogs out pulling on the leash and not listening to their people. Dog walk training sessions will lead your dog to listen and pay more attention to you, as well as just have greater skills.
  • Impress other people. You know it feels good when other people admire your amazing, beautiful, well-behaved dog. Dog walk training does that!

How to Prepare for Dog Walk Training

  1. Select some amazing treats you know your dog will love. You want them to be tiny so you can give out lots of them to your amazing dog. You want to take them with you whenever you go out on a walk.
  2. Select a dog treat bag. This can be a ziplock you put in your pocket or a sophisticated dog treat pouch, whichever works best for you.
  3. Think about what behaviors to you want to teach. You do not want to introduce too many at one time, and you may start with tricks and behaviors your dog already knows, until you get comfortable.
  4. Plan your path. Some areas are easier to train on than others and for some dog walk training, you will need a specific area to practice.
  5. Remind yourself that this is all for fun. You want to be upbeat and happy the entire time, not grumpy that your dog is learning.

Small dog looking up

Dog Walk Training Ideas

So you want to do some dog walk training sessions but you are not sure what to teach? There are so many options! Here are the behaviors and tricks I like to practice on every walk.

  1. Wait. This is one of my favorite behaviors and I use it at home all the time. It simply means, “pause where you are until I say it is ok to go.” You can use this at doors in your home and out on walks. In open space when my dog is off-leash, I use it to stop my dog from getting too far away from me. You should start this one at home because it is easiest to teach at an open door. Stand inside the door with your dog and say “Wait.” Then start to open the door. When you dog moves to dash through, close the door (without hitting your dog with it) and repeat. Eventually your dog will look to you to figure out what is going on. When you are ready, say “ok” and release your dog with lots of praise and walk through the door.
  2. Auto sit at street curbs. This can be a life saver if your dog ever gets off-leash. It is easy to teach – just whenever you get to a curb have your dog sit. Do not move on until she does. You can choose to add a release word, like “ok”, or just let her walk with you when you move forward.
  3. Quick sits. I love this for attention and focus from my dog, plus it is fun! As you are moving along randomly tell your dog to “Sit” in a super happy voice. Reward her for sitting quickly. Usually the more excited you are, the faster your dog will sit and the more she will pay attention to you. You can also do this with “Down” but I try not to make my dog lie down in areas where she will feel vulnerable, so be aware of the environment.
  4. Quick front. A front is when your dog sits in front of you, facing you. If you make this into a really fun game, your dog can be called back from a distance. It is great for safety. Having a different word from Come is good, because most people use Come when they are angry (which you should not, but that is another blog). “Front” is always fun! It is great to practice on walks. As you are walking along, suddenly say “Front!” and shuffle backwards. Hold your treat up in the middle of your chest. Your dog will naturally follow you and sit as she gets closer. If you later practice in bigger spaces, try this while running away for a bigger effect. When she gets close, turn towards her and give her the chance to sit in front.

Really, almost any tricks you want to teach can be practiced on a dog walk for fun and focus. They help you have fun and encourage your dog to pay attention. Remember to use treats as your dog is learning and to continue to reinforce behavior. As your dog learns, you do not need to give a treat every time, but if you do it randomly then your dog will stay interested.

What NOT To Teach

You notice no where in that list did I mention “Heal.” Heal is a tough command and is often misused. No dog can heal for an entire walk, nor should they. A walk is a time for dogs to get out and explore the world! They cannot do that if they are glued to your hip. Dogs require both physical and mental stimulation to be healthy, which means seeing new environments and experiencing the world around them. Give them the chance to do that, while still having a good time. You should practice how to walk on a loose leash, but you will find that if you are interacting with your dog with Dog Walk Training, she will be paying a lot more attention and will be checking in regularly to see what you are doing. It is hard to check in and pull on the leash at the same time.

8 Times When You Need a Dog Walker

 

Most people believe that dog walkers are only needed by people who work 12 hours a day, and while it is necessary in that case, there are a bunch of reasons when a dog walker can be helpful. We are going to look at when you may need a dog walker and how professional dog walks work.

When Can I Use a Dog Walker?

  1. When you are working long days. This is the most common reason for people to hire a dog walker. They are working for longer than their pup can last and they want to make sure she gets out for some exercise and a potty break during the day. Usually these visits are scheduled during the middle of the day, but can also be arranged based on your work schedule.
  2. When your dog needs some extra exercise. Some of us do not have the time, or energy, to exercise our dogs as much as they need in a day. The average dog needs at least a 30 minute walk a day in order to stay happy, but high energy dogs can require a lot more than that.
  3. When your life gets crazy! We all have those times when everything piles on and we just cannot get to it all. Having a dog walker come in and make sure that your pup is happy can take a load off your mind and free you up to work on tasks that only you can do. Dog walkers can also help out by feeding your pup and taking care of other small tasks when needed.
  4. When you have a puppy. Puppies need to go out often and be supervised constantly. A standard rule of thumb is puppies can only hold it for one hour per month of age. This will vary based on the breed of puppy, their schedule and the puppy herself. It is hard to get anything done, when you have a puppy needing so much time and attention. Even if you are home all done, it can be nice to have someone help out for awhile so you can take a break.
  5. When you have problems with mobility. We have had quite a few clients that are injured or elderly and need some extra help. This includes folks in assisted living facilities who are able to keep their dogs but cannot get them out for walks.
  6. When your dog is bored. Maybe you are able to get your dog out but he is still bored during the day. A new friend coming in and changing up the routine will excite any dog and relieve the boredom.
  7. When your dog is elderly or ill. Older dogs often need to get out more, especially if they develop health problems. Dogs with injuries or illnesses may need medication during the day or supervision while you are gone. We have spent time with more than one dog in a cone!
  8. When your life is unpredictable! You have a job and kids and never know when the schedule is going to change. Dogs, as flexible as they are, thrive on routine. Knowing your pup is cared for, no matter what life throws at you, is a huge weight off your shoulders, and great for your dog!

These are just a handful of reasons you may need a dog walker. Really there is no end to the reasons you may need a dog walker in your life, nor should there be! A dog walker is there to provide your dog with consistency and you with peace of mind.

Some Examples Visits

Visits can be matched to your dog’s needs, but it is nice to get an idea of some possible schedules. We customize our visits and schedules based on the needs of your dog to make sure their visits are optimized.

  • Standard Mid-Day Dog Walk: Your dog walker comes in around noon (or whenever is a good time) and takes your pup for a walk. They go for a 25 minute dog walk, then the sitter refills your pup’s water, gives her a treat, sends you a picture of your pup to check in, leaves a quick note about the visit and settles your pup in for the afternoon. You know how your dog is doing and do not have to worry about her for the afternoon. These walks can also be longer for high energy dogs.
  • Twice a Day Visits: You are not on vacation, but you need a bit of extra help with your pup. You sitter comes in twice a day (breakfast and dinner), takes your dog out for a 20 minute walk, feeds her, changes her water and takes care of other critters. This way the basic care is done and you can enjoy the time spent with your fur kids without stress. This schedule is used by people who are busy, but also injured or elderly people who struggle with mobility.
  • Quick Potty Breaks: Some dogs do not need a walk but still need a potty break during the day. Your dog walker comes and let your pup out in the yard for 10 minutes, send you a quick update, change her water and settle her in for the day. These are great for dogs who do not need a lot of exercise but need to go potty and break up their day.
  • Long Exercise Visit: Many of us have high energy dogs and need help daily, or even just occasionally to burn off that energy. Your sitter comes at a good time of day and takes her for a 50 minute walk. During the summer we try to schedule these at times when the temperature is not too hot.

What to Consider When Scheduling Dog Walks

  1. Are your dog walks dependent on a specific time, like breakfast, dinner or halfway through the day, or just to get your dog some extra exercise?
  2. What times are you going to do be gone?
  3. How often does your dog need to go outside?
  4. How much exercise does she need to stay happy and healthy?
  5. What time of day is best for her to be out on a walk (if it is really hot or cold during the day)?
  6. Will she need to be fed during this visit?
  7. Do any other animals need care during the visit?
  8. Do you want visits regularly or just occasionally?

Let Us Help!

We are here to discuss your dog and schedule and figure out the best scenario for you. Contact us and let us know what is going on in your life so we can figure out a schedule that works for you and your pup! Our schedules are flexible and we match our visits to your needs, not the other way around.

Cute Pet Pictures

 

We have the cutest clients! Every day our sitters send tons of pictures and video of their furry friends to their parents while they are away. We like to share these on social media and here on our website (with client permission of course). We love showing off our friends!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See WAY MORE Cute Pet Pictures (we had too many for this page)

Why Does My Dog Not Like Walking In The Rain?

 

My three year old loves playing in the rain and jumping in puddles. But do you know who doesn’t love being in the rain? Our dog Rigsby. He hates going out in the rain, even to potty; that means taking a walk in the rain is absolutely out of the question.

So, why do so many dogs hate walking in the rain? We’ve compiled a few reasons why and ways to help get them out during rainy days.

 

  • Pelted Coats & Soggy Paws

Sometimes the reason is as simple as your dog doesn’t like the damp outdoors. Dogs coats are very sensitive. If you notice a dog getting rained on you can see their fur twitching, which has to be pretty annoying for them. Same goes for your dog’s paws. I mean, do you like walking on the wet ground in bare feet? I didn’t think so. Between the rain on their backs and the water on the ground, walking in the rain can be a pretty miserable experience for your dog.

 

  • Thunderstorm Phobias

A lot of times rain mean thunder and lightning. Animals have the knack for sensing storms before we even know they are coming. When dogs with storm phobias sense the change in the air and barometric pressure, the anxiety starts to creep up. A dog with storm phobia shouldn’t be forced to go outside because it may make it worse. Some dogs have a natural predisposition to have anxiety, others have had traumatic experiences with loud noises. But for the most part, there is no telling why your dog has thunderstorm phobias. All you can do is work with them and help them through it. 

 

  • How You Can Help

Rain happens and sometimes for days at a time. Your dog will still need to get out and use the potty at some point. Luckily there are some great products out there to help your dog through the distaste and fear of the rain.

Doggy Anti-Anxiety Stress Reducing Jacket 

Image from Amazon

Help your dog stay calm with this stress-reducing jacket. Similar to swaddling a baby, this jacket helps comfort your dog when they are feeling anxious.

Storm Stress Relaxing Drops for Dogs

 

Stress from storms, hurricanes or even strong wind can be reduced with these drops.

 

Dog Boots 

Keep their paws dry during the storm and even in the snow with these cute little dog boots.

Transparent Umbrella with Leash

Avoid the pelting rain with this cute leash umbrella combo. Perfect for the rainy and snowy days.

 

Waking in the rain doesn’t have to be a terrible experience for you and your dog. With a better understanding and a few good tools, there is sunshine at the end of the storm!

How to Catch a Loose Dog

 

It is every dog owners worse fear: your best friend has gotten loose and is running away from you at breakneck speed. You see him rounding the corner and no matter how much you yell he is not coming back or even slowing down. So what do you do to catch a loose dog?

A note: I write this article as if it were your dog that is loose. Truth is, this applies to any dog you come across in your travels. It seems to be the more you like dogs the more likely you are to come across a stray dog!

Know the Motivation

First off you need to understand what is motivating your dog. There are two main possibilities:

  1. Your dog is frightened out of his mind
  2. Your dog is having a grand time being free
  3. A combination of the two

Be familiar with dog body language so you can judge which is the case. It will make a huge difference when deciding which approach to use.

The Don’ts

  • Whether your dog is fearful or having fun, do not yell at your dog in a stern voice. If you are going to call your dog, use the happiest, highest pitch voice you can muster.
  • Do not chase the dog.  Running towards a dog is a threatening move and will startle any animal. If you are moving towards a dog, do so in a casual manner and turn your body slightly sideways so you do not face the dog head on.

The Fearful Dog

Something has frightened your dog and his brain is no longer working like normal. Everything seems threatening and he is looking for a place to be safe. Safety here is key! When deciding how to approach your dog consider how he is going to perceive it and take the least threatening action.

  • If possible, I repeat, do not chase your dog. You want to get just close enough for him to recognize you but not close enough to drive him away. Fearful dogs are very attuned to anything moving towards them and will be more inclined to run away as soon as he sees you. When you approach twist your body to the side or even walk backwards. Consider kneeling but be careful not to lean forward if possible as that is a threatening movement.
  • When possible try to guide your dog to a contained area like a fenced yard or an alleyway. A contained dog is much easier to catch but you want to be careful that the dog is not panicked enough to bite. use caution and get help when possible.
  • If you get close enough to your dog for him to recognize you, lay down on the ground and call his name in a happy tone. The shorter you are the less threatening you seem and a person laying on the ground piques the curiosity of most dogs. You have to do this quickly before your dog turns to run away.
  • “Wanna go for a car ride?” This phrase inspires most of the canine community to race headlong for the nearest vehicle. I have caught more stray dogs this way than any other! The key is to get the car close enough and to get out of the way. Open a door and move to the other side of the car while calling out phrases like “Car ride? Let’s go!” Sometimes it even helps to open both of the back doors so the dog does not feel as trapped. Then close them both quickly if the dog gets inside. I have even had luck driving up next to a dog and opening the driver’s side door to have the dog jump into my lap.

The I-Am-Having-a-Great-Time Dog

  • You definitely do not want to chase this dog as that just makes running more fun. “Look, Mom, we are both running! Let’s keep going all afternoon!” The key here is to be much more fun that whatever your dog is exploring. Get close enough to your dog to get his attention then call his name in a super excited voice. Next, run the opposite direction. Yes, the opposite direction. Dogs love nothing more than to chase things, especially their best friend. Run away from your dog while calling their name and often they will chase right after you and be so happy that you came out to play with them.
  • If the chase game does not immediately work then try out the car trick. What is more fun than a car ride?
  • If you are following the dog on foot try getting another dog to join you for a fun time. Or if your dog stops to say hi to another dog on a walk ask the person to grab your dog for you. A dog having fun will often visit with other people and dogs, even though he will not come to you.

If These Do Not Work

  • If all of these options fail you can also try using treats to bribe a dog closer or rent a trap from your local humane society. Both of these options take much longer and tend to be best used if your dog is loose in a quiet area.
  • Try calling other people to help corral your dog, even if that means following along behind for awhile to keep track of him.
  • Do not give up hope! Eventually, something will go your way.

Once You Catch Your Dog

  • Above all else, once you catch your dog you want to praise him and tell him what a great dog he is. If he gets away again you do not want him to avoid you because you yelled at him.
  • Use this as a reminder to work on your recall command!
  • Be happy that you were around when your dog got loose so that you were able to track him down.

 

Why Does My Dog Not Like New Year’s Eve?

If you are asking yourself this question, then you’ve probably had a traumatizing experience with Fido while watching the Times Square ball drop at midnight. If you’re like most people, New Year’s Eve is a night filled with lots of family, friends, fun, and noise. LOTS of noise. Though the noise may not bother you, your dog’s hearing is four times better than yours. Their natural instinct is to RUN.

One minute you’re cuddling with Fido and the next he is nowhere to be found. He most likely ran outside or hid under the bed, searching for a secure place to hide. While you’re frantically running around looking for your precious pooch, you get a knock on the door from your neighbor saying they found him wandering in their front yard. You think to yourself, “I’m so lucky I found you”.

If you can relate to this scenario, your dog most likely does not like New Year’s Eve.

A few reasons your dog doesn’t like New Year’s Eve

  • Decorations

See those streamers, balloons and party hats? They may be fun for you, but for Fido? Not so much. He may be scared and not recognize you. This may lead to a change in behavior and his reactivity to you. If he shows signs of fear, take the hat off and reassure your pup that everything will be okay.

  • Loud Noises

Noise makers, cheering and laughter are all part of the New Year’s Eve festivities. These are all scary noises for Fido. You may find him trembling and whining in fear. Ask your guests to bring the noise down a notch, and put your dog in a separate room with the TV or radio on.

  • Crowds

Is it your turn to host the annual New Year’s Eve party? Whether you are hosting a huge party, or it’s a group of your closest friends, these people are getting in your dog’s personal space. Large crowds are scary and Fido may react adversely. If your dog is not a social creature, spare him the anxiety and put him in a separate room.

  • Fireworks

Are your neighbors the type to set off fireworks in the middle of the street and make a huge commotion? If you answered yes, this may be why Fido is shaking uncontrollably while you “ooh” and “ah” at the light show. Fireworks are some of the scariest, loudest noises for dogs. Turn up the TV and keep your furry friend in a secure kennel or bedroom. If you have the opportunity to, try to stroke his back while you reassuringly hold him.

The reasons mentioned above may just be the tip of the iceberg to why your dog does not like New Year’s Eve. Just remember, while you’re excited and ready to ring in the New Year, keep your furry friend in mind!

 

How Late Can I Cancel a Dog Walk?

 

 

When can I cancel a dog walk?

If you are a client of Wet Noses Pet Sitting then you will want to know how to cancel a dog walking appointment. Everyone has to do it at some point, due to weather, illness, or a just a change of plans.

  • To get credit for the walk, or not be charged – cancel by 9am the day of the dog walk.
  • After 9am, you will be charged for the dog walking appointment. At that point the sitter has set aside the time for your visit and we are not able to fill the spot.
  • You are never charged if you cancel a dog walk due to an “Act of God” such as extreme weather or government shutdown.

How do I cancel a dog walk?

  • If you are cancelling more than 4 days in advance, you can cancel a scheduled dog walking appointment by logging into your account and just cancelling the appointment.
  • If you are cancelling within 4 days, contact us directly to cancel a dog walk. That way we can notify the sitter directly of the change.

Wet Noses Pet Sitting strives on making our clients happy, but our schedules can be tight. That’s why we ask that you use consideration and cancel an appointment for a walk as soon as possible. This allows us to fill the spot for your sitter and adjust schedules as needed. Although we understand that unexpected situations arise that change plans!

Important Items to Bring When Hiking with Your Dog

I don’t know about you, but disconnecting from the world and getting out into nature is one of my favorite things. However much fun it can be, it does have the potential to be dangerous if you’re not prepared. This is even more true if you decided to bring your canine companion with you. Luckily, with a few important items hiking with your dog can be one of the best ways to spend the day.

 

Doggy Backpack

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Hiking with your dog does mean extra supplies, so make them carry their own backpack with an extra leash and other supplies. Make sure not to overload it, the general rule is for the pack to weigh one pound to every 20 lbs of pup.

Collapsible Food and Water Bowls

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A perfect item for you dog’s backpack is a collapsible bowl set for their food and water. This way no matter where on the trail you are, both of you can take a break for hydration and trail mix.

Paw Protecting Dog Booties

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If you’re navigating particularly rocky terrain or if your dog is somewhat new to being outside on rough ground you may want to pack a pair of these puppy paw protecting boots. These are also perfect for hot pavement or sand.

 

Heavy Duty Waste Bags

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The rule of the trail is what you pack in, you pack out. This is the same for waste unless your on a trail that allows you to scoop and bury someone off the main path. Either way packing heavy duty scent eliminating bags is essential. You may also want to bring a compact bag dispenser for them as well.

 

Me & My Dog Medical Kit

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Bring a first aid kit is a hiking must, but having one made for both you and your dog is helpful and saves space of bringing extra doggy necessities on top of your own first aid kit.

 

Other things to consider

  • Make sure your dog is trained well enough to obey commands while hiking
  • Bring bug spray and sunscreen for both of you (baby/kid friendly products work well for dogs)
  • Update ID’s and/or microchip and bring an extra set of tags if you can
  • Snap a picture of your dog before you head out
  • Make sure their shots are up to date

 

Hiking is blast. But it is more than just fun in the woods, being prepared is key to a successful trip.

What trails do you like to take with your dog? Let us know your favorite trails and hiking with your dog tips!