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What Pet Sitting Visits Do I Need for My Rabbit?

 

Are you going out of town but are worried about your rabbit? House rabbits are becoming more popular as people realize just how smart they are and how rabbits can make amazing house pets. We are seeing more clients that have a rabbit as their only pet, and we want to make sure they receive the best care when you go out of town. Rabbits need to be watched by someone knowledgeable about their behavior, how to hold and handle them, and what health signs to watch out for if they become ill.

Rabbit Option #1

This is an ideal schedule for rabbits that are used to lots of attention.

1 Hour Breakfast Visit

Your sitter will arrive in the morning and let your rabbit out to play in whatever area is normal. Your sitter will play with your bunny (if she wants) and let her get some exercise. Your sitter will clean her cage, give her fresh food and water and can chop veggies or do any food prep you normally do. There is also time for a good cage and litter box cleaning. An hour visit really lets your rabbit stretch her legs and get some good activity and attention. Your sitter ends the visit by securing your rabbit back in her space, giving her any treats she can have and sending you an update so you know she is safe and sound!

30 Minute Dinner Visit

Your sitter will come for a dinner visit for some playtime and exercise, as well as a dinner feeding. At the end of the visit your sitter will settle your bunny in for the night and make sure she is happy and content.

 

Rabbit Option #2

This is an ideal schedule for rabbits that need feeding twice a day.

30 Minute Breakfast Visit

Your sitter will arrive and check on your bunny. She can come out to play, explore and get some cuddles. Her sitter will clean up her cage and litter box, give her fresh food and water and make sure her behavior is normal. After some exercise, your bunny can go back in her cage for breakfast and treats (if you say so). Your sitter will send you and update to let you know she is doing great!

30 Minute Dinner Visit

Your sitter will come for a dinner visit for some playtime and exercise, as well as a dinner feeding. At the end of the visit your sitter will settle your bunny in for the night and make sure she is happy and content.

These visits could be 15 minutes if your bunny will not be coming out to play, however, if your bunny is used to getting exercise, we prefer to stick to her normal routine as much as safely possible. We also want to ensure there is plenty of time for food prep and cleaning, depending on how your system for bunny care is set up.

 

Rabbit Option #3

This is an ideal schedule for rabbits that need feeding once a day.

30 Minute Breakfast Visit

Your sitter will arrive and check on your bunny. She can come out to play, explore and get some cuddles. Her sitter will clean up her cage and litter box, give her fresh food and water and make sure her behavior is normal. After some exercise, your bunny can go back in her cage for breakfast and treats (if you say so). Your sitter will set her up for the day and send you and update to let you know she is doing great! 

Our Considerations for Rabbits

For rabbits, there are some very specific steps we take to keep them as safe and relaxed as possible.

  • Rabbits can take some time to warm up to new people and we want to do that as safely as possible, for your bunny and your sitter. If your bunny has playtime outside of her normal housing, at first we may want to keep your rabbit in a smaller play area until we can be sure she will go back into her enclosure or allow the sitter to pick her up when play time is done. We do not want to scare your bunny or risk injury by needing to chase her! Once she is used to her sitter then we can expand the play area to her normal space if it is larger, or a run of the house if that is normal.
  • If your bunny is going to be coming out for playtime, that visit will need to be at least 30 minutes long to provide enough time for everything to be completed.
  • For rabbits that will not be coming out for playtime, we can usually manage 15 minute visits unless there is a lot of food prep or extra tasks. If there is then we will often need a 30 minute visit to get everything taken care of.
  • If your rabbit is more active at a particular time of day, then we will want to schedule your longer visits during that time so she can have some fun! Some bunnies love morning playtime, some love the warm afternoons and some like to zip around before dinner!
  • Your sitter will want to know the routine of your bunny and any normal behavior changes. It is not unusual for bunnies to be sleepy at one time of the day and very active at another time, and all bunnies are different. If we know these behaviors then we can keep an eye out for any lethargy that is out of place.
  • Rabbits are prone to gastrointestinal issues that can be harmful very quickly. Rabbit owners often have medical supplies on hand and special veterinarians to reach in an emergency. Your sitter will need all of that information on hand in case any concerns arise.
  • If you are leaving for a long trip, we are willing and able to purchase fresh veggies at your request. We will schedule a separate visit time and arrange a method of payment to cover the food purchases.
  • Rabbits need a lot of mental stimulation and we want to help with that. If there are toys she likes or games she likes to play, please show your sitter so we can have fun and make the most of our visits!

Time to Customize!

We want to work with you to set up the best possible schedule for your hens, so you are all happy during your trip. We also know that each home is different, and a lot of people have more than just one pet! After you have the basic idea of your schedule we sit down to figure out the nitty-gritty:

  • Are there any other pets in the home that need feeding, medication, etc? We make sure your visit has enough time to get everything done.
  • We have time to clean out food and water bowls, clean up any messes, etc.
  • Many people who love animals, also love plants! Short visits do not have a lot of time for plants. If you need the sitter to water more than 1-2 plants, we will need to schedule a longer visit for those days. If you have beautiful summer gardens, then we need to see how long they take to water and add that on to your normal visits.
  • Household tasks such as; bringing in the newspaper, collecting the mail, turning lights off and on and taking out the trash. This can all be done on your normal schedule.
  • Do you want updates every visit? Many clients do, just keep in mind that your sitter will take a couple minutes to send an update.
  • Keep in mind that it will take a sitter a bit longer to get the work done than it takes you. Especially if you have extensive routines for your pets and home. You have had years to perfect your system! We always try to make sure your pet sitter will have enough time for everything. That way they will not feel stressed and your pets will receive the focus they deserve.

Work With Us to Keep Your Rabbit Happy While You are Gone!

 

8 Times When You Need a Dog Walker

 

Most people believe that dog walkers are only needed by people who work 12 hours a day, and while it is necessary in that case, there are a bunch of reasons when a dog walker can be helpful. We are going to look at when you may need a dog walker and how professional dog walks work.

When Can I Use a Dog Walker?

  1. When you are working long days. This is the most common reason for people to hire a dog walker. They are working for longer than their pup can last and they want to make sure she gets out for some exercise and a potty break during the day. Usually these visits are scheduled during the middle of the day, but can also be arranged based on your work schedule.
  2. When your dog needs some extra exercise. Some of us do not have the time, or energy, to exercise our dogs as much as they need in a day. The average dog needs at least a 30 minute walk a day in order to stay happy, but high energy dogs can require a lot more than that.
  3. When your life gets crazy! We all have those times when everything piles on and we just cannot get to it all. Having a dog walker come in and make sure that your pup is happy can take a load off your mind and free you up to work on tasks that only you can do. Dog walkers can also help out by feeding your pup and taking care of other small tasks when needed.
  4. When you have a puppy. Puppies need to go out often and be supervised constantly. A standard rule of thumb is puppies can only hold it for one hour per month of age. This will vary based on the breed of puppy, their schedule and the puppy herself. It is hard to get anything done, when you have a puppy needing so much time and attention. Even if you are home all done, it can be nice to have someone help out for awhile so you can take a break.
  5. When you have problems with mobility. We have had quite a few clients that are injured or elderly and need some extra help. This includes folks in assisted living facilities who are able to keep their dogs but cannot get them out for walks.
  6. When your dog is bored. Maybe you are able to get your dog out but he is still bored during the day. A new friend coming in and changing up the routine will excite any dog and relieve the boredom.
  7. When your dog is elderly or ill. Older dogs often need to get out more, especially if they develop health problems. Dogs with injuries or illnesses may need medication during the day or supervision while you are gone. We have spent time with more than one dog in a cone!
  8. When your life is unpredictable! You have a job and kids and never know when the schedule is going to change. Dogs, as flexible as they are, thrive on routine. Knowing your pup is cared for, no matter what life throws at you, is a huge weight off your shoulders, and great for your dog!

These are just a handful of reasons you may need a dog walker. Really there is no end to the reasons you may need a dog walker in your life, nor should there be! A dog walker is there to provide your dog with consistency and you with peace of mind.

Some Examples Visits

Visits can be matched to your dog’s needs, but it is nice to get an idea of some possible schedules. We customize our visits and schedules based on the needs of your dog to make sure their visits are optimized.

  • Standard Mid-Day Dog Walk: Your dog walker comes in around noon (or whenever is a good time) and takes your pup for a walk. They go for a 25 minute dog walk, then the sitter refills your pup’s water, gives her a treat, sends you a picture of your pup to check in, leaves a quick note about the visit and settles your pup in for the afternoon. You know how your dog is doing and do not have to worry about her for the afternoon. These walks can also be longer for high energy dogs.
  • Twice a Day Visits: You are not on vacation, but you need a bit of extra help with your pup. You sitter comes in twice a day (breakfast and dinner), takes your dog out for a 20 minute walk, feeds her, changes her water and takes care of other critters. This way the basic care is done and you can enjoy the time spent with your fur kids without stress. This schedule is used by people who are busy, but also injured or elderly people who struggle with mobility.
  • Quick Potty Breaks: Some dogs do not need a walk but still need a potty break during the day. Your dog walker comes and let your pup out in the yard for 10 minutes, send you a quick update, change her water and settle her in for the day. These are great for dogs who do not need a lot of exercise but need to go potty and break up their day.
  • Long Exercise Visit: Many of us have high energy dogs and need help daily, or even just occasionally to burn off that energy. Your sitter comes at a good time of day and takes her for a 50 minute walk. During the summer we try to schedule these at times when the temperature is not too hot.

What to Consider When Scheduling Dog Walks

  1. Are your dog walks dependent on a specific time, like breakfast, dinner or halfway through the day, or just to get your dog some extra exercise?
  2. What times are you going to do be gone?
  3. How often does your dog need to go outside?
  4. How much exercise does she need to stay happy and healthy?
  5. What time of day is best for her to be out on a walk (if it is really hot or cold during the day)?
  6. Will she need to be fed during this visit?
  7. Do any other animals need care during the visit?
  8. Do you want visits regularly or just occasionally?

Let Us Help!

We are here to discuss your dog and schedule and figure out the best scenario for you. Contact us and let us know what is going on in your life so we can figure out a schedule that works for you and your pup! Our schedules are flexible and we match our visits to your needs, not the other way around.

How to Find a Missing Pet in Larimer County

Loosing a pet can be extremely scary, especially if you do not know where to start looking. There is a lot of information out there on how to find a missing pet, but I wanted to write something specific to Larimer County (Fort Collins, Loveland, Windsor, Wellington, Berthoud, Timnath) so you can just go down the checklist and get it done.

1. The Basics

For the first few minutes after a pet goes missing, you want to start with the basics.

  • Do a patrol of the area to see if you find any evidence of Fluffy
  • Talk to the neighbors, especially anyone working outside, to see if they noticed Fluffy going by
  • If Fluffy is a dog, swing by her favorite places to walk or any place for play dates to see if she went there
  • Read up on How to Catch a Loose Dog for some tips if you do see her running free

2. Who to Contact First

You have done the basic search and turned up nothing. This is typically 15-30 minutes after you have realized Fluffy is missing. Now it is time to reach out for help.

  • Larimer Humane Society – call to speak to animal control over the phone and give them a heads up that you just lost your pet. To submit a lost report you have to go into the shelter.
    • (970) 226-3647
    • 3501 E 71st Street, Loveland, CO 80538
  • If Fluffy has a microchip, contact the company to let them know she is missing and how to reach you, just in case your information is not up to date.
  • Contact any veterinarians, groomers and pet supply stores in your immediate area (around a mile from where she went missing), in case someone picks her up and brings her in.

3. Social Media Time!

The internet is your best friend when it comes to finding a pet. Your friends and complete strangers are going to be happy to help you search the interwebs for any news of Fluffy.

  • Post on all of your personal social media networks. Include a recent picture, where and when she went missing and any directions you want people to follow, such as how to contact you, not to chase Fluffy, Fluffy is afraid of men, etc. Specifically ask people to share the post. If you know any people in the animal world, such as your normal dog walker or groomer, ask them to share since they have such a large reach.
  • Post on these pages. There are many pages specifically dedicated to helping reunite missing pets with their people. Post on as many as you can, but start with Facebook. That is where we have had the most luck in recent years.
    • Lost and Found Pets of Northern Colorado – Facebook group that is very active and easy to post in.
    • Nextdoor – This is a newish system for people to coordinate with their neighborhoods on various subject. When you post it can be seen by those directly in your area.
    • Post on Craigslist in the Community -> Pets section as well as Community -> Lost+Found. There is no charge to do so.
    • Helping Lost Pets – You have to fill out their online form, which gives you a flyer you can use and their website has a ton of helpful tips. Once you fill out the form, they will post it in their Facebook group.
    • PawBoost – You can pay for upgraded service, but they list your pet for free on Facebook and in their database.
    • LostMyDoggie – They post on Facebook but they also alert local shelters and rescues.
    • PetKey – A smaller page, but everything helps!
  • Head out and continue looking for Fluffy. Make sure you are able to answer the phone if someone calls! Ask your neighbors to check their garages, sheds and yards to make sure she is not hiding there.

4. What is the Next Step?

If you are approaching evening, there are a few steps you can take, especially if Fluffy is shy and still might be in the area.

  1. Double check with any neighbors coming home to make sure they did not see her earlier in the day.
  2. Consider leaving your door open so Fluffy can come in at night, if she was lost from your home.
  3. If Fluffy is a cat, place her litter box outside where she can smell it.

5. The Next Day

You have done all of the fast, easy options and Fluffy has not been found. Now is time to dig in and spread the word that Fluffy is missing.

  • File a lost pet report with Larimer Humane Society, if you have not already done so. Consider also reaching out to the Humane Society of Weld County, the Cheyenne Animal Shelter, the Longmont Humane Society or the Humane Society of Boulder Valley. Animals can travel a surprisingly long ways and folks sometimes pick them up and take them to their local shelter, which may not be Larimer County.
  • Post a lost pet ad in the Coloradoan or Reporter Herald, or small local papers. It may seem outdated, but they are still read regularly.
  • Contact local breed rescues that relate to Fluffy. For instance, if she is a Golden Retriever, contact the local Golden rescue. There are too many for me to list here, and they change regularly, so search online for one. You can also contact All Breed Rescue Network at (888) 440-6467. They keep a running list of breed rescues in the Colorado area. Sometimes breed rescues will be able to offer more suggestions or help specific to your breed.
  • Print off flyers from one of the sources you used yesterday. Post flyers in veterinary hospitals, groomers, trainers, pet supply stores, the dog park and anywhere animal related. Many local businesses also have community boards. Start with businesses near you and increase the distance the longer Fluffy is missing. Posting flyers on mailboxes and phone poles is illegal, although many people do it.
  • Continue to update posts online. People will be wondering if you found Fluffy and you want to keep them searching. Ask for help again and for people to keep sharing your posts.
  • Talk to people in the neighborhood where Fluffy went missing. Offer a reward for any information leading to finding her.
  • If you hear of people spotting her, go to that area and search. Shy animals can be very hard to catch, especially during active times of the day when there are a lot of people around. If you believe she might be in the area, go out during quiet times in the evening or morning when she is more likely to appear. You can also look at renting a humane trap if you are sure she is there but cannot catch her.

6. DO NOT Give Up Hope

The longer you search the more discouraged you become. Keep looking! Here are a few searches I have helped with over the years for people I know:

  • A small, very shy dog went missing. We tracked her to a neighborhood where kids had spotted her (we paid them to keep an eye out for her). After a few days we were not able to find her until a kid came forward. A woman in the neighborhood had picked her up and had given her to a family member in Colorado Springs. Once confronted we were able to get her back.
  • A dog ran out his front door. The neighbors a few houses down saw him, but not not the people at the end of the block. He vanished! They continued searching and found him late that night being walked by a nice couple who lived down the street. They had been leaving earlier when they saw him run by, so they put him in the garage and then left for a few hours. They had just returned home.
  • A woman’s dog had been missing for months. She sent out flyers to shelters across the country and he showed up here, in Larimer County. Turned out a trucker had picked her up and driven her across 3 states before dropping her off at the local shelter!

We regularly hear stories of animals being reunited years after going missing due to their microchips. Keep that information up-to-date and continue your search!

7. Once you Find Your Pet

Congratulations! I am so excited for you and you must feel so relieved!

  • Take the moment and enjoy it. Do not scold Fluffy, she is just happy to see you!
  • Plan a trip to the vet if your pet was gone for awhile or appears to be injured.
  • Go back and take down those flyers, lost pet reports and postings online so that everyone knows you found your fur kid.
  • Return the favor and share information about missing pets for other people!

If you have a resource that is not listed, Please Let Us Know so we can get it added!

Pet Lovers Guide to Fort Collins

Are you one of the many pet lovers living in Fort Collins? Or maybe you are thinking of getting a pet soon. Either way, eventually you will need a Pet Sitter, Dog Walker, Cat Sitter, Vet, Dog Trainer, Groomer, Rescue or Pet Shop.

But how do you find the best solution for you and your pets? We have put together a list of resources for pet lovers to make this easier for you!

 

Fort Collins Pet Sitter

Choosing the right pet sitter for your pet can be difficult. You want to ensure your sitter is correct for your household and your pets. Because of that we put together an ebook A Pet Owner’s Guide to Hiring a Pet Sitter or Dog Walker to give you all of the information you need to hire a pet sitter that is a good match for you.

Download our printable checklist on Hiring a Pet Sitter or Dog Walker to help in your search.

To learn more about our pet sitters take a look at our About Us page. To learn about our services, visit our Services page.

If you have a pet sitter and want to make sure you are prepared for your trip, download our Preparing for Your Pet Sitter Checklist.

 

Fort Collins Dog Walker

Dog walkers are great for dog who have a lot of energy and people who do not have enough time. A dog walk can be nice for a day when you work late, or just cannot get away to take out your pup. To learn about how to hire a dog walker, take a look at our ebook A Pet Owner’s Guide to Hiring a Pet Sitter or Dog Walker. This can guide you through why you may need a dog walker, how they work and how you find one that is a wonderful match for your household.

If you want to learn about the Benefits of Regular Dog Walks, read our recent article. If you want to learn about our dog walking services, take a look at our services page.

 

Pet Supply Stores around Fort Collins

Fort Collins is extremely animal friendly, and thus there are a variety of pet supply stores to choose from. We are a huge fan of shopping local whenever possible, and we believe locally-owned stores tend to have better educated employees to give you advice.

We have collected a list of our favorite pet supply stores in town:

A good pet supply store should be able to offer suggestions on products based on your pet’s health needs. Ask some questions and if you do not feel comfortable then try a different store.

 

Fort Collins Rescues

As such an animal friendly city, Fort Collins has a wide variety of rescues. It would be impossible to list them all here, but we wanted to provide you the groups that are large and most likely to be able to meet your needs. Whether you want to adopt a new pet or just have questions, these rescues are all great!

Here are the rescues most likely to be of assistance:

If one of these organizations cannot answer your questions, they will refer you to someone who can.

 

Fort Collins Veterinarians

With Fort Collins hosting CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, we are flush with amazing veterinarians. Choosing a veterinarian that is a good fit for you

Here is a list of veterinarians that we have worked with personally and loved:

If you need help choosing your new veterinarian, read our recent article 5 Tips to Picking a Veterinarian You Love.

 

Fort Collins Emergency Veterinarians

 

When you have a pet emergency, you want to make sure to get the best care for your animal, no matter what time of day! Emergency vet clinics are open 24/7, 365 days a year and can be a lifesaver when you need one. It is important to know where your closest clinic is so you know where to go right away.

Here are emergency veterinary clinics and their locations:

To see the full list with all of the Fort Collins emergency vet clinics, as well as signs of a pet emergency, read our recent article Fort Collins Emergency Vet Clinics.

 

Fort Collins Dog Trainers

All dogs can use a little training, whether is be the normal sit and stay, or learning how to stop your puppy from chewing on your shoes. Plus training classes can be fun for you and your dog to have some bonding time! Dogs are smart animals and need to use their brains to keep them from getting bored.

We have collected 4 trainers that use positive reinforcement training:

When choosing a dog trainer you want to pick one that works with your dog in a positive and fear-free manner.

 

Fort Collins Dog-Friendly Hotels

If you are coming to Fort Collins to visit or if you find yourself needing to stay in a hotel for awhile, you want to have a hotel that is friendly for your dog.

We have made a list of hotels that are dog friendly and wonderful for you!

If you are visiting Fort Collins and need to leave your dog while you go out for an activity, consider having a pet sitter come stay in your hotel. This will give your dog company and make sure she does not get in any trouble while you are gone. We provide extended stays for these types of trips which you can learn about in our services.

 

Fort Collins Dog Groomers

A good haircut is important to the health and happiness of your dog. Considerate groomers can make the grooming process as easy as possible.

We have collected a list of groomers that our clients have loved:

If you would like to read more about these groomers and get tips on how to pick the perfect groomer, read our recent article 5 Places for Dog Grooming in Fort Collins.

 

Self-Service Dog Washes in Fort Collins

If your dog does not need all the trimmings, it can sometimes be easier to clean them up yourself. It is wonderful to go to a self-service dog wash where you can use their space to get your pup clean without making a mess of your bathroom.

We have collected a list of self-service dog washes in Fort Collins:

To learn more about costs of using a self service dog wash, read our recent article How Much Does it Cost to Use a Self Service Dog Wash?

 

Fort Collins Catteries

When you are traveling you can either hire a pet sitter or board your cat in a cattery. There are advantages of each, and if you decide to board your cat there are a variety of options.

We have collected a list of catteries in Fort Collins:

If you are considering hiring a pet sitter, look at advantages of cat sitting and take a look at our services.

 

Dog Boarding Kennels in Fort Collins

 When leaving town you can either hire a pet sitter or board your dog in a kennel.

We have collected a list of the top places to board your dog in Fort Collins:

To read more about these dog boarding kennels, take a look at our recent article Top 5 Places to Board Your Dog in Fort Collins.

If you are considering pet sitting, read our recent article Why Should I Hire a Dog Sitter, and look at our services.

 

Fort Collins Doggy Daycare

When your dog needs some extra exercise, you have two options:

  1. Send your dog to daycare
  2. Hire a dog walker to exercise your dog

Dog daycare can be great for well socialized dogs who enjoy the company of other dogs. If you are unsure if daycare is a good option, read our recent article Doggy Daycare vs Dog Walker.

If it sounds like your pup would love daycare, we have collected a list of dog daycares in Fort Collins:

If you are thinking about using a dog walker take a look at our services.

 

Top Pet-Friendly Restaurants in Fort Collins

During nice weather it can be a bonus to be able to take your dog with you when you go out to eat. In Fort Collins we have many, many food options to choose from, so you might as well pick one where you can bring your pup!

These are good pet-friendly restaurants in Fort Collins:

To read more about these restaurants take a look at our recent article Top 5 Pet Friendly Restaurants in Fort Collins.

 

Fort Collins Dog Parks

In Fort Collins, folks love their dogs and we want them to have as much fun as possible! For well-socialized dogs, that can mean a trip to the dog park is a favorite activity.

Here in Fort Collins we have 5 dogs parks:

  • Soft Gold Dog Park – 520 Hickory Street
  • Spring Canyon Dog Park (aka Horsetooth Park) – west end of Horsetooth Road, has a small/shy dog area, water fountains and a swimming area
  • Fossil Creek Dog Park – 5821 S Lemay Ave, has a small/shy dog area and drinking fountains
  • Twin Silo Dog Park – 5480 Ziegler Road, has a small/shy dog area and drinking fountains
  • CSU track dog park – corner of East Lake Street and Peterson Street – not an official city dog park, but part of the track was fenced and relegated to the dogs

To see the City of Fort Collins rules for dog parks, visit their website.

 

Fort Collins Dog-Friendly Hiking Trails

Hiking is one of the most popular hobbies in Colorado, for good reason. The trails are beautiful all year round and there are many where you can bring your furry friend with you.

Three of our favorite trails are:

  1. Lory State Park- Well Gulch Nature Trail
  2. Fort Collins Natural Areas- Maxwell Natural Area
  3. Horsetooth Mountain Park- Horsetooth Falls

To see all the details about these trails, read our recent article Best Fort Collins Dog Trails.

 

Do you have a resource you think should be added to the Pet Lovers Guide to Fort Collins? Let us know via our contact form so we can check it out!

Getting a Cat – Complete Checklist for New Cat Owners

 

Cats make wonderful companions and are great additions to any family. They are creatures of comfort, so if you’re a first-time cat owner, make sure to have all the essentials ready for them. Getting a new kitty is a big change for you and for your new friend. To help make this time easier for you, we’ve got the complete checklist of everything thing you need and need to know.

Download the Complete Preparing for a New Cat  Checklist

Important Considerations:

Lifestyle: While it’s true that cats don’t exactly need as much time as a new dog, but they still need love, attention and a stable family life. Ask yourself the following questions before jumping into adoption.

  • Do you or anyone in the house have allergies to cat hair, dander or dirt?
  • Do you have any other pets that may not take well to a new cat? If so, do you have a plan of introducing them to each other?
  • Who will be the primary caretaker?
  • Do you want a long hair or short hair breed? Long hair breeds will take more time for daily grooming and may have more hairballs.
  • Will work or social life affect your ability to properly care for them?
  • Does your residence allow pets and is your home suited for a new cat?
  • Would an older cat or younger cat better suit your lifestyle? Kittens take more time and have more energy, but older cats may need more veterinarian care.

Costs: You want to make sure that you can always care for your vet. The best way is to create a budget for a new cat before you bring them home.

  • Does your new pet need to be spayed or neutered?
  • Is there an adoption fee that needs to be paid?
  • Monthly expenses such as food, litter, pet sitting or new supplies
  • Licensing fees and rabies shots
  • Litter box and scoop
  • Routine veterinary care
  • Microchipping
  • Grooming Brush
  • Beds and toys

Shopping Checklist:

Once you’ve decided a new cat will fit well into your lifestyle and you can afford the cost of care, the next thing to do is hit the pet store to get them their supplies.

  • Age appropriate food
  • Water and food bowls
  • Collar
  • Leash
  • ID tags (make sure your phone number is on it)
  • Hard plastic cat carrier
  • Litter Box
  • Litter Scoop
  • Brush
  • Sponge and scrub brush for accidents and hairball clean up
  • Non-toxic cleaner
  • Toys (feathers on wands, catnip mouse, etc)
  • Blanket or bed
  • Cat toothbrush and toothpaste

There’s no doubt that cats add spunk and tons of joy to any home. They may seem aloof, but in reality, they are just as caring as they are smart. A peaceful home full of warmth and love is a perfect place for a new feline friend.

Download the Complete Preparing for a New Cat  Checklist

Why Should I Hire a Cat Sitter?

When you leave town, deciding what to do with your cat can be a challenge. Should you hire a cat sitter? Should you board your cat? Or should you find a kind friend to step in?

She Gets to Stay Home

Cats are the most comfortable in their own space. By allowing them to stay in areas that are familiar, you cat will be happier and much less stresses. She can maintain her normal routine, feeding times, litter box and familiar space.

Keep Her Healthy

Cats who stay home are not exposed to other animals or illnesses. When boarding a cat she will be exposed to other cats and possible illnesses. Cats can easily become sick with an upper respiratory infection, which is what plagues shelters because it can travel through the air.

 

Make Sure She Eats

Cats that are stressed often stop eating, leading to a cascade of health problems. With a sitter, your cat can stay home and remain as stress-free as possible.

Sitters Notice Changes

Cats can become ill quickly, or not show symptoms until they are very sick. Since you kitty will be at home, changes in behavior will easily be noticed quickly with a sitter checking on her daily.

Home Security

With a sitter coming at least once a day, your home will appear lived in and remain secure. Sitters can bring in mail and newspaper, change lights and blinds, and take care of any other household concerns. This can prevent theft and make sure that your house is cared for in your absence.

Schedules

If you are considering hiring a cat sitter, no matter what sitter you use, we have a list of ideas for schedules. The schedule for your cat depends on your cat’s personality and finding the right one is important to keep her happy and healthy.

Questions?

If you are curious about our services or animal care in general, feel free to contact us! We are very active on social media and you can find up on Facebook Live regularly answering questions about animal care. Join us!

Why Does My Dog Not Like Walking In The Rain?

 

My three year old loves playing in the rain and jumping in puddles. But do you know who doesn’t love being in the rain? Our dog Rigsby. He hates going out in the rain, even to potty; that means taking a walk in the rain is absolutely out of the question.

So, why do so many dogs hate walking in the rain? We’ve compiled a few reasons why and ways to help get them out during rainy days.

 

  • Pelted Coats & Soggy Paws

Sometimes the reason is as simple as your dog doesn’t like the damp outdoors. Dogs coats are very sensitive. If you notice a dog getting rained on you can see their fur twitching, which has to be pretty annoying for them. Same goes for your dog’s paws. I mean, do you like walking on the wet ground in bare feet? I didn’t think so. Between the rain on their backs and the water on the ground, walking in the rain can be a pretty miserable experience for your dog.

 

  • Thunderstorm Phobias

A lot of times rain mean thunder and lightning. Animals have the knack for sensing storms before we even know they are coming. When dogs with storm phobias sense the change in the air and barometric pressure, the anxiety starts to creep up. A dog with storm phobia shouldn’t be forced to go outside because it may make it worse. Some dogs have a natural predisposition to have anxiety, others have had traumatic experiences with loud noises. But for the most part, there is no telling why your dog has thunderstorm phobias. All you can do is work with them and help them through it. 

 

  • How You Can Help

Rain happens and sometimes for days at a time. Your dog will still need to get out and use the potty at some point. Luckily there are some great products out there to help your dog through the distaste and fear of the rain.

Doggy Anti-Anxiety Stress Reducing Jacket 

Image from Amazon

Help your dog stay calm with this stress-reducing jacket. Similar to swaddling a baby, this jacket helps comfort your dog when they are feeling anxious.

Storm Stress Relaxing Drops for Dogs

 

Stress from storms, hurricanes or even strong wind can be reduced with these drops.

 

Dog Boots 

Keep their paws dry during the storm and even in the snow with these cute little dog boots.

Transparent Umbrella with Leash

Avoid the pelting rain with this cute leash umbrella combo. Perfect for the rainy and snowy days.

 

Waking in the rain doesn’t have to be a terrible experience for you and your dog. With a better understanding and a few good tools, there is sunshine at the end of the storm!

Why Does My Dog Not Like New Year’s Eve?

If you are asking yourself this question, then you’ve probably had a traumatizing experience with Fido while watching the Times Square ball drop at midnight. If you’re like most people, New Year’s Eve is a night filled with lots of family, friends, fun, and noise. LOTS of noise. Though the noise may not bother you, your dog’s hearing is four times better than yours. Their natural instinct is to RUN.

One minute you’re cuddling with Fido and the next he is nowhere to be found. He most likely ran outside or hid under the bed, searching for a secure place to hide. While you’re frantically running around looking for your precious pooch, you get a knock on the door from your neighbor saying they found him wandering in their front yard. You think to yourself, “I’m so lucky I found you”.

If you can relate to this scenario, your dog most likely does not like New Year’s Eve.

A few reasons your dog doesn’t like New Year’s Eve

  • Decorations

See those streamers, balloons and party hats? They may be fun for you, but for Fido? Not so much. He may be scared and not recognize you. This may lead to a change in behavior and his reactivity to you. If he shows signs of fear, take the hat off and reassure your pup that everything will be okay.

  • Loud Noises

Noise makers, cheering and laughter are all part of the New Year’s Eve festivities. These are all scary noises for Fido. You may find him trembling and whining in fear. Ask your guests to bring the noise down a notch, and put your dog in a separate room with the TV or radio on.

  • Crowds

Is it your turn to host the annual New Year’s Eve party? Whether you are hosting a huge party, or it’s a group of your closest friends, these people are getting in your dog’s personal space. Large crowds are scary and Fido may react adversely. If your dog is not a social creature, spare him the anxiety and put him in a separate room.

  • Fireworks

Are your neighbors the type to set off fireworks in the middle of the street and make a huge commotion? If you answered yes, this may be why Fido is shaking uncontrollably while you “ooh” and “ah” at the light show. Fireworks are some of the scariest, loudest noises for dogs. Turn up the TV and keep your furry friend in a secure kennel or bedroom. If you have the opportunity to, try to stroke his back while you reassuringly hold him.

The reasons mentioned above may just be the tip of the iceberg to why your dog does not like New Year’s Eve. Just remember, while you’re excited and ready to ring in the New Year, keep your furry friend in mind!

 

Top 3 Halloween Costume Safety Tips For Your Pets

 

Halloween is fast approaching and we’re all busy planning. There is no doubt costumes are on our minds; whether it’s for yourself, your kids or your fur-babies. And it’s a whole lot of fun dressing up for Halloween. However, there are some costume safety tips you need to know for your pet.

1. Comfort is key

A lot of times Halloween can be chilly. Use an old jacket or sweater for a costume to keep them warm and festive. Something along the lines of a superhero, or firefighter would be good; simple and sweet, but most importantly comfortable for your pet. It needs to be loose fitting, but snug enough

costume safety

that they don’t trip on it.

2. Watch out for choking hazards

Tying on hats or scarves can be super cute too, but make sure you watch them to avoid getting stuck or having the tie wrap around their neck too tightly. Also, avoid costumes where there can chew off small pieces which could cause them to choke or have gestational issues.

3. Keep an eye on them at all times

Make sure to watch your pet carefully for signs of discomfort. You know how miserable it is to be stuck in an uncomfortable outfit. If your dog seems to be suffering for the sake of fashion, maybe it’s time to snap a quick pic for the memory book. Then let sleeping dogs lie for the rest of the night.

When you research pet costumes online, you will undoubtedly run into people say that dressing up your pet for Halloween is cruel. They say your pets don’t understand why or what is going on.  Other people love it because it can be in good fun and it’s a great time to make wonderful memories with the family.


Overall, it’s best to use your judgement and make sure to keep an eye on how they react to the costume.  If your pet is accustomed to clothing, then dressing up in a costume could be a breeze for them.  But, if the costume seems to cause them stress or is a bother to them, then maybe it’s best to leave the costume at home.

There are some great ideas for extremely easy and stress-free costumes for your pets, so make sure to check back and see what other ideas we’ve put together for you this Halloween!

September: Emergency Preparedness Month – Preparing with Pets

 

After seeing two extremely powerful hurricanes hit the U.S. and the raging wild fires in Oregon, it makes us all consider what we would do in a natural disaster. And it’s actually a perfect time to think about your plans since September is National Emergency Preparedness Month.

We should always be ready for whatever life throws at us, like hurricanes, droughts, fire, flood, landslides, tornadoes, terrorism, and more. There are a few things we can do that will make any disaster a little easier, especially when there are pets involved. 

Emergency Preparedness for Pets

  • Update and secure collars
  • Update microchips or have microchips implanted
  • Create a list of pet-friendly accommodations if you need to evacuate
  • Keep a recent picture of each pet
  • Make a list of emergency 24hr vets in your area
  • Have emergency food and supplies on hand
  • Have a carrier and leash for each pet
  • Coordinate with neighbors, family, friends and pet sitters in case you get stranded and your pet is home alone aloneEmergency Preparedness

Make an Emergency  Kit

It’s always important to have an emergency preparedness kit at home. Here are a few items you need to make sure to have on hand. If you’re going to be evacuated, you’ll need a 3 day supply of materials.  If you’re staying at home it’s best to plan for 2 weeks.

  • Water: One gallon, per person per day
  • Food: Stock up on at least a 3 day supply of non-perishable, easy to prepare food. Include plenty of pet food and a manual can opener. 
  • Flashlights and electric tea candles
  • First aid kit that includes pet supplies
  • Batteries, including backup batteries or chargers for phones
  • Battery powered or hand crank radio
  • Camping stove/battery powered hot plate to warm up food

There are so many things to worry about during an emergency. If you have some of your basic necessities covered, you’ll have that much more peace of mind. Plan for every member of your family, including your pets. Disasters happen fast and can hit hard. Having even the smallest plan in place will help you know how to navigate if it happens to you.

In case an emergency was to happen while a Wet Noses Pet Sitter was at your home we will do everything to keep your pet safe. We will coordinate with you and keep your pets safe until they can be reunited with you.