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5 Valentine’s Day Gifts For Your Dog

 

Is your dog your Valentine this year? How can you show your dog some love, other than belly rubs? Here are some Valentine’s Day gifts for your dog!

Spa Package 

Every dog loves getting pampered (and us humans love a less smelly dog). Check out Animal House Rescue and Grooming for dog grooming and nail trims. Want to pamper your dog at home? Try giving him a doggie massage. Start with a flat palm and run your hand over all parts of your dog’s body. Move in one swift motion over your dog’s sides and back with light pressure. The first few massages will help you figure out what normal feels like for your dog. After this you can feel spots on your dog that are swollen or need some extra loving.

Toys and Bones 

Most dogs love new toys and bones. Check out your local pet store for cool Valentine’s Day toys for the dog. For the more destructive dogs, try Kong indestructible toys. For the dog who loves to chew, check out antler chews, which are dropped deer antlers. Be sure to pick bones or toys that are not a choking hazard to your dog.

valentine's

 

Treats 

 

Every dog loves treats! Check out our previous article on Valentine’s Day dog treats or check your local pet store for dog treats. Also,most local pet boutiques have a bakery and sell special Valentine’s Day cookies.

Winter Clothing 

In February it can be a little chilly for outside fun with your dog, but with some winter weather gear your dog can play outside. Check out a winter coat or some winter boots as Valentine’s Day gifts for your dog. The coat will help keep your dog warm on winter walks and boots will help keep his paws ice ball free.

Quality Time

Most dogs love spending time with their people and it can be the best gift you can give them. Try taking your dog to the dog park or on a long car ride.

With these gifts, you can make give a special gift to that special dog in your life. These Valentine’s Day gifts for your dog are sure to please.

Why Does My Dog Not Like Walking In The Rain?

 

My three year old loves playing in the rain and jumping in puddles. But do you know who doesn’t love being in the rain? Our dog Rigsby. He hates going out in the rain, even to potty; that means taking a walk in the rain is absolutely out of the question.

So, why do so many dogs hate walking in the rain? We’ve compiled a few reasons why and ways to help get them out during rainy days.

 

  • Pelted Coats & Soggy Paws

Sometimes the reason is as simple as your dog doesn’t like the damp outdoors. Dogs coats are very sensitive. If you notice a dog getting rained on you can see their fur twitching, which has to be pretty annoying for them. Same goes for your dog’s paws. I mean, do you like walking on the wet ground in bare feet? I didn’t think so. Between the rain on their backs and the water on the ground, walking in the rain can be a pretty miserable experience for your dog.

 

  • Thunderstorm Phobias

A lot of times rain mean thunder and lightning. Animals have the knack for sensing storms before we even know they are coming. When dogs with storm phobias sense the change in the air and barometric pressure, the anxiety starts to creep up. A dog with storm phobia shouldn’t be forced to go outside because it may make it worse. Some dogs have a natural predisposition to have anxiety, others have had traumatic experiences with loud noises. But for the most part, there is no telling why your dog has thunderstorm phobias. All you can do is work with them and help them through it. 

 

  • How You Can Help

Rain happens and sometimes for days at a time. Your dog will still need to get out and use the potty at some point. Luckily there are some great products out there to help your dog through the distaste and fear of the rain.

Doggy Anti-Anxiety Stress Reducing Jacket 

Image from Amazon

Help your dog stay calm with this stress-reducing jacket. Similar to swaddling a baby, this jacket helps comfort your dog when they are feeling anxious.

Storm Stress Relaxing Drops for Dogs

 

Stress from storms, hurricanes or even strong wind can be reduced with these drops.

 

Dog Boots 

Keep their paws dry during the storm and even in the snow with these cute little dog boots.

Transparent Umbrella with Leash

Avoid the pelting rain with this cute leash umbrella combo. Perfect for the rainy and snowy days.

 

Waking in the rain doesn’t have to be a terrible experience for you and your dog. With a better understanding and a few good tools, there is sunshine at the end of the storm!

Why Does My Dog Not Like New Year’s Eve?

If you are asking yourself this question, then you’ve probably had a traumatizing experience with Fido while watching the Times Square ball drop at midnight. If you’re like most people, New Year’s Eve is a night filled with lots of family, friends, fun, and noise. LOTS of noise. Though the noise may not bother you, your dog’s hearing is four times better than yours. Their natural instinct is to RUN.

One minute you’re cuddling with Fido and the next he is nowhere to be found. He most likely ran outside or hid under the bed, searching for a secure place to hide. While you’re frantically running around looking for your precious pooch, you get a knock on the door from your neighbor saying they found him wandering in their front yard. You think to yourself, “I’m so lucky I found you”.

If you can relate to this scenario, your dog most likely does not like New Year’s Eve.

A few reasons your dog doesn’t like New Year’s Eve

  • Decorations

See those streamers, balloons and party hats? They may be fun for you, but for Fido? Not so much. He may be scared and not recognize you. This may lead to a change in behavior and his reactivity to you. If he shows signs of fear, take the hat off and reassure your pup that everything will be okay.

  • Loud Noises

Noise makers, cheering and laughter are all part of the New Year’s Eve festivities. These are all scary noises for Fido. You may find him trembling and whining in fear. Ask your guests to bring the noise down a notch, and put your dog in a separate room with the TV or radio on.

  • Crowds

Is it your turn to host the annual New Year’s Eve party? Whether you are hosting a huge party, or it’s a group of your closest friends, these people are getting in your dog’s personal space. Large crowds are scary and Fido may react adversely. If your dog is not a social creature, spare him the anxiety and put him in a separate room.

  • Fireworks

Are your neighbors the type to set off fireworks in the middle of the street and make a huge commotion? If you answered yes, this may be why Fido is shaking uncontrollably while you “ooh” and “ah” at the light show. Fireworks are some of the scariest, loudest noises for dogs. Turn up the TV and keep your furry friend in a secure kennel or bedroom. If you have the opportunity to, try to stroke his back while you reassuringly hold him.

The reasons mentioned above may just be the tip of the iceberg to why your dog does not like New Year’s Eve. Just remember, while you’re excited and ready to ring in the New Year, keep your furry friend in mind!

 

Book Early For Wet Noses Pet Sitting Holiday Services

 

December is a busy time for a lot of us. Between holiday parties and visiting family, you’re often away from home for hours, if not days at a time. In fact, according to The American Pet Products Association (APPA), pet ownership is at an all-time high, with 68% of U.S. households—or 82.5 million homes have one or more pets. And more than two-thirds of those homes will need to find reliable pet care for the holiday season. That’s why it’s important to book early for any holiday services you need during the bustling holiday season.

Make sure to book Wet Noses Pet Sitting early to make sure your pet gets the best care.

It is important to call for an appointment as soon as you possible. Our schedules fill up incredibly fast during the month of December. We are licensed, insured and bonded, with highly trained pet sitters that will keep your pets happy and healthy while you’re away.

As Patti J. Moran, PSI founder and president states, “just finding a pet sitter in an online directory—or even on a nationally-publicized site—doesn’t ensure that person is a legitimate, qualified pet-sitting business,” Moran explains. “Anyone can post a profile advertising pet-sitting services, so it’s important for pet owners to take a closer look to ensure they are hiring a ‘real pet sitter’ to care for their pets.”

Why Hire a Pet Sitter for the Holidays?

Christmas decorations make the home more hazardous, so even if you’re away from home for a few hours, your pet can find all sorts of trouble to get into.

  • Trips to visit family
  • Long days shopping
  • Holiday parties

The holiday season is undoubtedly a time full of activity. From shopping to parties and quality time catching up with family, we spend most of December celebrating and spending time with our loved ones. But that doesn’t mean we should leave our furry family members at home to fend for themselves.

Book today to make sure your pet has a safe and happy holiday season too!

 


 

What Can My Cat Eat On Thanksgiving?

 

Thanksgiving is an exciting time of year for pet parents and their pets. They get to meet new people and possibly beg for some tasty turkey. Many pet parents (me included) want to share some of the wonderful food with our kitties, but this is not always a good idea. This blog will include what you can share with your kitty and some yummy treats so that your kitty can participate in the festivities.Thanksgiving

What can you share with your cat? 

Cats can eat a very diverse diet including meat, fish, some fruit and vegetables. However, their diet cannot include processed human food, foods high in sugar or foods with extra salt or seasonings.

1. Green Beans

A few green beans, fed occasionally is actually good for fluffy, but these aren’t the green beans in your green bean casserole. Keep your kitty’s green beans simple by steaming them until soft. Before cooking cut the green beans into small, 1/2 inch chunks.  For a special treat mix in some chunk tuna or wet food. Feed these as a treat or with your cat’s meal for a special Thanksgiving treat.

2. Baked Squash and Carrots 

Again, fed in moderation squash and carrots are good for your kitty. Make sure the squash and carrots are fully cooked before feeding it, as undercooked veggies are indigestible for your cat. Some people like to bake the squash at 350 degrees until soft, but you can also steam them (again until soft). Make sure you do not add any oil or seasoning to these vegetables. The fully cooked squash and carrots can be served mashed up or cut up in small, 1/2 inch chunks.

3. Turkey 

Cats can join in on this aspect of Thanksgiving fun. Make your kitty his or her own special turkey or set some meat aside. Cats cannot handle the seasoning or baste you put on your turkey, so simply bake the turkey in the oven, plain. Bake the turkey until fully cooked, raw turkey can make your kitty sick. Make sure you choose lower fat portions of the turkey and remove any bones before feeding. Cut the turkey up into small chunks or shreds. This can be feed as a treat for a few meals, like on Thanksgiving day. Turkey can be high in calories so feed only a small amount.

 

 


Special Thanksgiving Treats

Want to make your kitty something special for the holiday, try out these treat recipes special for cats.

Tuna Yum Yums

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup of flour
  • 1/4 cup of water
  • 1/2 cup of non-fat milk
  • 1/2 can of tuna
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil or fish oil
  • 1 beaten egg
  • Optional: a teaspoon of catnip, mint or parsley

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and place parchment paper on a cookie sheet
  2. Mash or cut the tuna into small pieces, mix in the flour and milk
  3. Pour in water and vegetable oil, then mix well
  4. In a separate dish, beat the egg
  5. Mix the beaten egg into the tuna mix
  6. Mix well, until the mix becomes dough like
  7. Shape the dough into small balls, about the size of blueberries and place on the baking sheet
  8. Cook the dough for 12 minutes or until golden brown. Stick a toothpick in to check that the treat is fully cooked
  9. Cool for an hour before feeding to your kitty and make sure not to over indulge them.

 


Kitty Casserole

Ingredients:

  • 1 can of tuna or salmon
  • 1 teaspoon of honey
  • 1/2 can of your cat’s favorite food
  • 1 teaspoon of dry cat food or treats

Directions:

  1. Combine all of the wet ingredients in a bowl
  2. Pour into a Tupperware or small casserole dish
  3. Top with dry food or treats
  4. Serve a small amount to your kitty

Feed this casserole in moderation, 1-2 tablespoons per day. Store in a closed container, in the refrigerator, for up to a week.

 

While most foods on the Thanksgiving table are off limits for your cat, these treats and tips can help make the holiday special for your cat. Let us know how your cat likes these treats by commenting on our Facebook page or commenting below!

 

Halloween Candy Safety For Dogs

 

What’s one of the first things to come to mind when you think of Halloween? Chances are, you’re thinking “CANDY!!!”.  Sugary treats are a definite favorite during this spook-tacular season. But there are some Halloween dangers that can also play not-so-sweet tricks on your pet’s health. Be sure to keep Fido and Fluffy away from the following items in your kid’s candy bag:

Bite-sized Hard Candy

Halloween candy

These sweet treats can pose a major choking hazard for your precious pet. Hard candy becomes slick when mixed with saliva, making it easy to be inhaled into the windpipe. Keep these tempting treats away from Fido and Fluffy!

Candy with Wrappers

 When pets get their paws on Halloween treats, they gobble them down, wrapper and all. Plastic and foil wrappers, when ingested, can cause an obstruction in the intestines and irritate the lining of the GI tract. Sometimes they can be passed without any issue, but it’s best to keep all wrapped treats away from your candy craving cat or canine.

Chocolate Covered Raisins

 These tasty treats may be a favorite amongst pet parents and their kids, but they combine two potentially deadly ingredients for dogs. When ingested, chocolate can cause vomiting, diarrhea and seizures, while raisins can trigger kidney failure. If your dog gets his paws on this delicious yet dangerous treat, take him to your veterinarian immediately!

Candy Corn and Other High Sugar Candies

 Sugar may have you and your kids climbing the walls, but it will only bring your pet down, causing painful and severe gas. What’s worse is that the sugar provides an excellent source of food for bad gut bacteria to dine on. This can pull water into the colon, causing an extra-messy case of diarrhea for Fluffy or Fido.

Sugar-free Candy and Gum

 Most sugar-free treats these days contain a sugar-substitute called Xylitol. While safe for people, Xylitol can be deadly if ingested by your canine companion. It causes a severe drop in blood sugar within minutes after ingestion, making dogs lethargic, unable to walk, and may cause seizure activity. Sadly if this happens, but they survive the initial symptoms, often the dog will be left with severe liver damage and potentially fatal liver failure, making this the most dangerous type of Halloween “treat” for dogs.

 

Calls to the veterinarians at the Pet Poison Helpline increase by 12 percent during the week of Halloween, making it the call center’s busiest time of year. If you suspect your pet has ingested something poisonous, call your veterinarian or the Helpline (1-800-213-6680) sooner rather than later. It’s always easier, less expensive, and safer for your pet to be treated earlier, versus when he’s showing severe symptoms of distress or poisoning from Halloween candy.

 

Will I Have the Same Pet Sitter My Entire Trip?

 

 

When you’re away from home for more than a few days you may wonder, will my pet always have the same pet sitter? And we have the answers for you!

For the most part, the answer is YES. You will have the same pet sitter the entire time.

If you’re booking us for a vacation or long trip, we will match you with a pet sitter that is available your entire trip. We’ll make sure that you have the best sitter for your household and your pets so you won’t have to worry while you’re away.

What if there is an emergency?

In case your usual sitter has an emergency then a manager will step in and take care of your pets. That’s on of the best things about hiring a professional pet sitter. No matter what happens, broken down cars, sickness, or any other emergency, your pet(s) needs will be met.

Regular Sitting Clients

We will try our hardest to have your usual sitter cover your entire trip. However, sometimes schedules don’t always align and your usual pet sitter may not be available. If that is the case we will match you with someone else that either do the entire time or split it up between two sitters.

Dog Walking Clients

Depending on the frequency of your dog walks, you may or may not have the same pet sitter the entire time. If you’re an occasional dog walking client then yes, you will have the same walker while you’re away. However, if you have more frequent walks, then we usually split your walks up between two walkers.

Will I Get to Meet the New Sitters or Walkers?

YES! We want you to feel as comfortable as possible. That’s why whenever a new sitter or walker is introduced you will have a chance to meet them. In fact, we will set up a free meet and greet opportunity so that your new sitter can meet you and your pets before you leave. You will always be notified of any changes.

Wet Noses Pet Sitting is always here for you to give you extra peace of mind.  You don’t need to worry about your pets during your vacation. After all, vacations are meant for relaxation, right?!

Contact us today to book your sitting and walking services for your vacation.

 

 

What Do Different Colored Collars and Leashes Mean?

 

Different Colored Collars and Leashes

Photo from Pinterest

 

Do you ever wish that people came with warning labels? Like, “Hasn’t Had Their Coffee,” “Doesn’t Play Well with Others,” “Generally a Nice Person” and so on? That way you know who to chat with at the store waiting in line on a slow cashier and also know who to avoid because confrontation is inevitable.

Well, people don’t have those labels yet, but there is a way to tell a dogs personality by their collars.

There are now different colored collars and leashes for our dogs. These help us know which dogs welcome affection and attention, have special needs, or are anxious about strangers or children.  While as dog owners it is still our responsibility to make sure our dogs are in  simple glance at the color helps others know how to interact with your dog. 


What do the colors mean?

Red: Dogs should be approached with caution.

Orange: Dogs are friendly toward adults and children, but they are not good with other dogs.

Green: Dogs are friendly toward people and other dogs.

Yellow: Nervous or anxious dispositions or if stated on the color it can also mean up for adoptions.

Blue: Dog in training or is a working dog.

White: This dog has hearing or sight problems or may be completely deaf or blind.


What I really love about these codes is that you never know what dog is friendly or not. People tend to think larger athletic dogs are not always friendly, especially those which are erroneously called the “bully breeds.”

Pit bulls, Staffordshire terriers, Doberman pinschers, and Rottweilers, to name a few, are often considered to be dogs you would want to stay away from.

From my personal experience some of these dogs were the sweetest I’ve ever met, while other smaller dogs were more aggressive. You can never tell a dog’s disposition from the breed alone.

So next time you see a dog with a different colored collars and leashes, remember it may be a message. Or if you have a dog that is out and about often, you may want to invest in one of these collars. It can only help you and your dog better relate with the people you encounter.

Top 5 Pet Friendly Restaurants in Fort Collins

One of the best ways to spend sunny days is sitting on a patio watching the people. Appetizers on your plate, cool drink in your hand. And what is even better is enjoying the sunshine and people with your dog by your side. A lot of times restaurants and dogs don’t mix, but don’t fret! Luckily, there are some great places around Fort Collins where your pet is welcome.

Fort Collins – Pet Friendly Restaurants

The Snooze Eatery

144 W Mountain Ave
Fort Collins, CO,  80524
(970) 482-9253

Perfect for a nice brunch out before hitting the park or shopping at a local pet store. They are Snooze is only open for breakfast and lunch, but it’s a definitely a great place to check out with your dog.

Coppersmith’s Pub & Brewery

5 Old Town Square
Fort Collins, Colorado 80524
(970) 498-0483

One of the most popular breweries in Ft. Collins, Coppersmith’s has a friendly staff as well as a dog friendly patio for you to enjoy.

Purple Cup Cafe

1119 W Drake Rd C30
Fort Collins, CO, US 80524
(970) 224-3599

For a nice fresh cup of Joe or a tasty lunch swing by the Purple Cup Cafe. It is a part of Gryphon Games and Comics, so you can enjoy a board game and comics while sipping your coffee.

Five Guys Burgers & Fries

2842 Council Tree Ave # 173
Fort Collins, CO, US
(970) 204-9140

Enjoy Five Guys famous burgers on the dog friendly patio with water bowls included. Relax on the corner with affordable food and fast service.

Wild Boar Cafe

1510 S College Ave
Fort Collins, CO, US 80526
(970) 472-1074

Dine in this special 1924 bungalow home-style cafe. Fresh food, friendly faces and a great atmosphere with a patio perfect for your pet.

 

It’s always fun to include our dogs in our daily life outside of the home. What are some of your favorite pet friendly restaurants in Fort Collins? Let us know on social media or Contact Us so we can add them!

 

5 Questions to Ask Your Vet at Your Next Visit

 

When you’re getting ready for your yearly physical, you probably have a few questions prepared for your doctor. And it’s smart to have them prepared ahead of time. Because if you’re like me, by time you’re in the back room, chances are you’ll forget to ask at least one thing you were concerned about.

The same should go for your pet at their regular wellness checks as well. There are just as many, if not more distractions at the vet. Sometimes that leaves you floundering for words and just hoping to get out unscathed.

Having a few good questions jotted down for easy reference will go a long way in making you get the most out of your pet’s vet visit.

1. Is my pet overweight?

Being on top of your pet’s weight is important. According to the Association for Pet Obesity and Prevention, more than half of the dogs and cats are overweight in the U.S. Even though we are almost conditioned to think “a fat pet is a happy pet,” that’s not true. Obesity sets them up for a whole slew of complications such as, diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and more.

2. What is the best food for my pet?

This question almost goes hand in hand with the weight question, but it is still beneficial for average weight pets as well. Not all pet food is created equal and some foods have fatty fillers and sub-par ingredients. Tell your vet what food you regularly feed your pet. Also, as they age dietary needs can change. Ask them what they feel is an appropriate diet for them considering their age and weight.

3. Do you have any recommendations for flea/tick meds?

Flea and ticks are not just a problem for the spring and summer. They can actually be a threat all year round. More than just a nuisance, they can transmit deadly diseases too. Depending on the time of year and your pet’s health in general, your vet may have a better way of protecting your pet.

4.Does my pet need a dental cleaning?

Often forgotten, but still very important is dental health. Recent surveys state that an estimated 80% of adult dogs and 70% of adult cats suffer from a least some degree of periodontal disease. If dental hygiene is ignored too long, it can result serious health issues with the liver, kidney, heart. Your vet should have some easy and painless ways to help.

5. Is this normal?

This is the general behavior or health question to ask your vet. It’s whatever may concern you about your pet. Like do they have a quirky behavior, a weird eating/sleeping habit? Or you may be worried about lumps or bumps on their skin. Reserve this question to fit what concerns you about your pet specifically.


A little bit of planning goes a long way in making sure you get all the answers you need. Doctors and vet visits are stressful enough as it is, no need to add stress to it by being unprepared.

Do you have any additional questions you like to ask your vet? Let us know in the comments!