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What Pet Sitting Visits Do I Need for My Rabbit?

 

Are you going out of town but are worried about your rabbit? House rabbits are becoming more popular as people realize just how smart they are and how rabbits can make amazing house pets. We are seeing more clients that have a rabbit as their only pet, and we want to make sure they receive the best care when you go out of town. Rabbits need to be watched by someone knowledgeable about their behavior, how to hold and handle them, and what health signs to watch out for if they become ill.

Rabbit Option #1

This is an ideal schedule for rabbits that are used to lots of attention.

1 Hour Breakfast Visit

Your sitter will arrive in the morning and let your rabbit out to play in whatever area is normal. Your sitter will play with your bunny (if she wants) and let her get some exercise. Your sitter will clean her cage, give her fresh food and water and can chop veggies or do any food prep you normally do. There is also time for a good cage and litter box cleaning. An hour visit really lets your rabbit stretch her legs and get some good activity and attention. Your sitter ends the visit by securing your rabbit back in her space, giving her any treats she can have and sending you an update so you know she is safe and sound!

30 Minute Dinner Visit

Your sitter will come for a dinner visit for some playtime and exercise, as well as a dinner feeding. At the end of the visit your sitter will settle your bunny in for the night and make sure she is happy and content.

 

Rabbit Option #2

This is an ideal schedule for rabbits that need feeding twice a day.

30 Minute Breakfast Visit

Your sitter will arrive and check on your bunny. She can come out to play, explore and get some cuddles. Her sitter will clean up her cage and litter box, give her fresh food and water and make sure her behavior is normal. After some exercise, your bunny can go back in her cage for breakfast and treats (if you say so). Your sitter will send you and update to let you know she is doing great!

30 Minute Dinner Visit

Your sitter will come for a dinner visit for some playtime and exercise, as well as a dinner feeding. At the end of the visit your sitter will settle your bunny in for the night and make sure she is happy and content.

These visits could be 15 minutes if your bunny will not be coming out to play, however, if your bunny is used to getting exercise, we prefer to stick to her normal routine as much as safely possible. We also want to ensure there is plenty of time for food prep and cleaning, depending on how your system for bunny care is set up.

 

Rabbit Option #3

This is an ideal schedule for rabbits that need feeding once a day.

30 Minute Breakfast Visit

Your sitter will arrive and check on your bunny. She can come out to play, explore and get some cuddles. Her sitter will clean up her cage and litter box, give her fresh food and water and make sure her behavior is normal. After some exercise, your bunny can go back in her cage for breakfast and treats (if you say so). Your sitter will set her up for the day and send you and update to let you know she is doing great! 

Our Considerations for Rabbits

For rabbits, there are some very specific steps we take to keep them as safe and relaxed as possible.

  • Rabbits can take some time to warm up to new people and we want to do that as safely as possible, for your bunny and your sitter. If your bunny has playtime outside of her normal housing, at first we may want to keep your rabbit in a smaller play area until we can be sure she will go back into her enclosure or allow the sitter to pick her up when play time is done. We do not want to scare your bunny or risk injury by needing to chase her! Once she is used to her sitter then we can expand the play area to her normal space if it is larger, or a run of the house if that is normal.
  • If your bunny is going to be coming out for playtime, that visit will need to be at least 30 minutes long to provide enough time for everything to be completed.
  • For rabbits that will not be coming out for playtime, we can usually manage 15 minute visits unless there is a lot of food prep or extra tasks. If there is then we will often need a 30 minute visit to get everything taken care of.
  • If your rabbit is more active at a particular time of day, then we will want to schedule your longer visits during that time so she can have some fun! Some bunnies love morning playtime, some love the warm afternoons and some like to zip around before dinner!
  • Your sitter will want to know the routine of your bunny and any normal behavior changes. It is not unusual for bunnies to be sleepy at one time of the day and very active at another time, and all bunnies are different. If we know these behaviors then we can keep an eye out for any lethargy that is out of place.
  • Rabbits are prone to gastrointestinal issues that can be harmful very quickly. Rabbit owners often have medical supplies on hand and special veterinarians to reach in an emergency. Your sitter will need all of that information on hand in case any concerns arise.
  • If you are leaving for a long trip, we are willing and able to purchase fresh veggies at your request. We will schedule a separate visit time and arrange a method of payment to cover the food purchases.
  • Rabbits need a lot of mental stimulation and we want to help with that. If there are toys she likes or games she likes to play, please show your sitter so we can have fun and make the most of our visits!

Time to Customize!

We want to work with you to set up the best possible schedule for your hens, so you are all happy during your trip. We also know that each home is different, and a lot of people have more than just one pet! After you have the basic idea of your schedule we sit down to figure out the nitty-gritty:

  • Are there any other pets in the home that need feeding, medication, etc? We make sure your visit has enough time to get everything done.
  • We have time to clean out food and water bowls, clean up any messes, etc.
  • Many people who love animals, also love plants! Short visits do not have a lot of time for plants. If you need the sitter to water more than 1-2 plants, we will need to schedule a longer visit for those days. If you have beautiful summer gardens, then we need to see how long they take to water and add that on to your normal visits.
  • Household tasks such as; bringing in the newspaper, collecting the mail, turning lights off and on and taking out the trash. This can all be done on your normal schedule.
  • Do you want updates every visit? Many clients do, just keep in mind that your sitter will take a couple minutes to send an update.
  • Keep in mind that it will take a sitter a bit longer to get the work done than it takes you. Especially if you have extensive routines for your pets and home. You have had years to perfect your system! We always try to make sure your pet sitter will have enough time for everything. That way they will not feel stressed and your pets will receive the focus they deserve.

Work With Us to Keep Your Rabbit Happy While You are Gone!

 

8 Times When You Need a Dog Walker

 

Most people believe that dog walkers are only needed by people who work 12 hours a day, and while it is necessary in that case, there are a bunch of reasons when a dog walker can be helpful. We are going to look at when you may need a dog walker and how professional dog walks work.

When Can I Use a Dog Walker?

  1. When you are working long days. This is the most common reason for people to hire a dog walker. They are working for longer than their pup can last and they want to make sure she gets out for some exercise and a potty break during the day. Usually these visits are scheduled during the middle of the day, but can also be arranged based on your work schedule.
  2. When your dog needs some extra exercise. Some of us do not have the time, or energy, to exercise our dogs as much as they need in a day. The average dog needs at least a 30 minute walk a day in order to stay happy, but high energy dogs can require a lot more than that.
  3. When your life gets crazy! We all have those times when everything piles on and we just cannot get to it all. Having a dog walker come in and make sure that your pup is happy can take a load off your mind and free you up to work on tasks that only you can do. Dog walkers can also help out by feeding your pup and taking care of other small tasks when needed.
  4. When you have a puppy. Puppies need to go out often and be supervised constantly. A standard rule of thumb is puppies can only hold it for one hour per month of age. This will vary based on the breed of puppy, their schedule and the puppy herself. It is hard to get anything done, when you have a puppy needing so much time and attention. Even if you are home all done, it can be nice to have someone help out for awhile so you can take a break.
  5. When you have problems with mobility. We have had quite a few clients that are injured or elderly and need some extra help. This includes folks in assisted living facilities who are able to keep their dogs but cannot get them out for walks.
  6. When your dog is bored. Maybe you are able to get your dog out but he is still bored during the day. A new friend coming in and changing up the routine will excite any dog and relieve the boredom.
  7. When your dog is elderly or ill. Older dogs often need to get out more, especially if they develop health problems. Dogs with injuries or illnesses may need medication during the day or supervision while you are gone. We have spent time with more than one dog in a cone!
  8. When your life is unpredictable! You have a job and kids and never know when the schedule is going to change. Dogs, as flexible as they are, thrive on routine. Knowing your pup is cared for, no matter what life throws at you, is a huge weight off your shoulders, and great for your dog!

These are just a handful of reasons you may need a dog walker. Really there is no end to the reasons you may need a dog walker in your life, nor should there be! A dog walker is there to provide your dog with consistency and you with peace of mind.

Some Examples Visits

Visits can be matched to your dog’s needs, but it is nice to get an idea of some possible schedules. We customize our visits and schedules based on the needs of your dog to make sure their visits are optimized.

  • Standard Mid-Day Dog Walk: Your dog walker comes in around noon (or whenever is a good time) and takes your pup for a walk. They go for a 25 minute dog walk, then the sitter refills your pup’s water, gives her a treat, sends you a picture of your pup to check in, leaves a quick note about the visit and settles your pup in for the afternoon. You know how your dog is doing and do not have to worry about her for the afternoon. These walks can also be longer for high energy dogs.
  • Twice a Day Visits: You are not on vacation, but you need a bit of extra help with your pup. You sitter comes in twice a day (breakfast and dinner), takes your dog out for a 20 minute walk, feeds her, changes her water and takes care of other critters. This way the basic care is done and you can enjoy the time spent with your fur kids without stress. This schedule is used by people who are busy, but also injured or elderly people who struggle with mobility.
  • Quick Potty Breaks: Some dogs do not need a walk but still need a potty break during the day. Your dog walker comes and let your pup out in the yard for 10 minutes, send you a quick update, change her water and settle her in for the day. These are great for dogs who do not need a lot of exercise but need to go potty and break up their day.
  • Long Exercise Visit: Many of us have high energy dogs and need help daily, or even just occasionally to burn off that energy. Your sitter comes at a good time of day and takes her for a 50 minute walk. During the summer we try to schedule these at times when the temperature is not too hot.

What to Consider When Scheduling Dog Walks

  1. Are your dog walks dependent on a specific time, like breakfast, dinner or halfway through the day, or just to get your dog some extra exercise?
  2. What times are you going to do be gone?
  3. How often does your dog need to go outside?
  4. How much exercise does she need to stay happy and healthy?
  5. What time of day is best for her to be out on a walk (if it is really hot or cold during the day)?
  6. Will she need to be fed during this visit?
  7. Do any other animals need care during the visit?
  8. Do you want visits regularly or just occasionally?

Let Us Help!

We are here to discuss your dog and schedule and figure out the best scenario for you. Contact us and let us know what is going on in your life so we can figure out a schedule that works for you and your pup! Our schedules are flexible and we match our visits to your needs, not the other way around.

How to Find a Missing Pet in Larimer County

Loosing a pet can be extremely scary, especially if you do not know where to start looking. There is a lot of information out there on how to find a missing pet, but I wanted to write something specific to Larimer County (Fort Collins, Loveland, Windsor, Wellington, Berthoud, Timnath) so you can just go down the checklist and get it done.

1. The Basics

For the first few minutes after a pet goes missing, you want to start with the basics.

  • Do a patrol of the area to see if you find any evidence of Fluffy
  • Talk to the neighbors, especially anyone working outside, to see if they noticed Fluffy going by
  • If Fluffy is a dog, swing by her favorite places to walk or any place for play dates to see if she went there
  • Read up on How to Catch a Loose Dog for some tips if you do see her running free

2. Who to Contact First

You have done the basic search and turned up nothing. This is typically 15-30 minutes after you have realized Fluffy is missing. Now it is time to reach out for help.

  • Larimer Humane Society – call to speak to animal control over the phone and give them a heads up that you just lost your pet. To submit a lost report you have to go into the shelter.
    • (970) 226-3647
    • 3501 E 71st Street, Loveland, CO 80538
  • If Fluffy has a microchip, contact the company to let them know she is missing and how to reach you, just in case your information is not up to date.
  • Contact any veterinarians, groomers and pet supply stores in your immediate area (around a mile from where she went missing), in case someone picks her up and brings her in.

3. Social Media Time!

The internet is your best friend when it comes to finding a pet. Your friends and complete strangers are going to be happy to help you search the interwebs for any news of Fluffy.

  • Post on all of your personal social media networks. Include a recent picture, where and when she went missing and any directions you want people to follow, such as how to contact you, not to chase Fluffy, Fluffy is afraid of men, etc. Specifically ask people to share the post. If you know any people in the animal world, such as your normal dog walker or groomer, ask them to share since they have such a large reach.
  • Post on these pages. There are many pages specifically dedicated to helping reunite missing pets with their people. Post on as many as you can, but start with Facebook. That is where we have had the most luck in recent years.
    • Lost and Found Pets of Northern Colorado – Facebook group that is very active and easy to post in.
    • Nextdoor – This is a newish system for people to coordinate with their neighborhoods on various subject. When you post it can be seen by those directly in your area.
    • Post on Craigslist in the Community -> Pets section as well as Community -> Lost+Found. There is no charge to do so.
    • Helping Lost Pets – You have to fill out their online form, which gives you a flyer you can use and their website has a ton of helpful tips. Once you fill out the form, they will post it in their Facebook group.
    • PawBoost – You can pay for upgraded service, but they list your pet for free on Facebook and in their database.
    • LostMyDoggie – They post on Facebook but they also alert local shelters and rescues.
    • PetKey – A smaller page, but everything helps!
  • Head out and continue looking for Fluffy. Make sure you are able to answer the phone if someone calls! Ask your neighbors to check their garages, sheds and yards to make sure she is not hiding there.

4. What is the Next Step?

If you are approaching evening, there are a few steps you can take, especially if Fluffy is shy and still might be in the area.

  1. Double check with any neighbors coming home to make sure they did not see her earlier in the day.
  2. Consider leaving your door open so Fluffy can come in at night, if she was lost from your home.
  3. If Fluffy is a cat, place her litter box outside where she can smell it.

5. The Next Day

You have done all of the fast, easy options and Fluffy has not been found. Now is time to dig in and spread the word that Fluffy is missing.

  • File a lost pet report with Larimer Humane Society, if you have not already done so. Consider also reaching out to the Humane Society of Weld County, the Cheyenne Animal Shelter, the Longmont Humane Society or the Humane Society of Boulder Valley. Animals can travel a surprisingly long ways and folks sometimes pick them up and take them to their local shelter, which may not be Larimer County.
  • Post a lost pet ad in the Coloradoan or Reporter Herald, or small local papers. It may seem outdated, but they are still read regularly.
  • Contact local breed rescues that relate to Fluffy. For instance, if she is a Golden Retriever, contact the local Golden rescue. There are too many for me to list here, and they change regularly, so search online for one. You can also contact All Breed Rescue Network at (888) 440-6467. They keep a running list of breed rescues in the Colorado area. Sometimes breed rescues will be able to offer more suggestions or help specific to your breed.
  • Print off flyers from one of the sources you used yesterday. Post flyers in veterinary hospitals, groomers, trainers, pet supply stores, the dog park and anywhere animal related. Many local businesses also have community boards. Start with businesses near you and increase the distance the longer Fluffy is missing. Posting flyers on mailboxes and phone poles is illegal, although many people do it.
  • Continue to update posts online. People will be wondering if you found Fluffy and you want to keep them searching. Ask for help again and for people to keep sharing your posts.
  • Talk to people in the neighborhood where Fluffy went missing. Offer a reward for any information leading to finding her.
  • If you hear of people spotting her, go to that area and search. Shy animals can be very hard to catch, especially during active times of the day when there are a lot of people around. If you believe she might be in the area, go out during quiet times in the evening or morning when she is more likely to appear. You can also look at renting a humane trap if you are sure she is there but cannot catch her.

6. DO NOT Give Up Hope

The longer you search the more discouraged you become. Keep looking! Here are a few searches I have helped with over the years for people I know:

  • A small, very shy dog went missing. We tracked her to a neighborhood where kids had spotted her (we paid them to keep an eye out for her). After a few days we were not able to find her until a kid came forward. A woman in the neighborhood had picked her up and had given her to a family member in Colorado Springs. Once confronted we were able to get her back.
  • A dog ran out his front door. The neighbors a few houses down saw him, but not not the people at the end of the block. He vanished! They continued searching and found him late that night being walked by a nice couple who lived down the street. They had been leaving earlier when they saw him run by, so they put him in the garage and then left for a few hours. They had just returned home.
  • A woman’s dog had been missing for months. She sent out flyers to shelters across the country and he showed up here, in Larimer County. Turned out a trucker had picked her up and driven her across 3 states before dropping her off at the local shelter!

We regularly hear stories of animals being reunited years after going missing due to their microchips. Keep that information up-to-date and continue your search!

7. Once you Find Your Pet

Congratulations! I am so excited for you and you must feel so relieved!

  • Take the moment and enjoy it. Do not scold Fluffy, she is just happy to see you!
  • Plan a trip to the vet if your pet was gone for awhile or appears to be injured.
  • Go back and take down those flyers, lost pet reports and postings online so that everyone knows you found your fur kid.
  • Return the favor and share information about missing pets for other people!

If you have a resource that is not listed, Please Let Us Know so we can get it added!

Pet Lovers Guide to Loveland

Are you one of the many pet lovers living in Loveland? Or maybe you are thinking of getting a pet soon. Either way, eventually you will need a Pet Sitter, Dog Walker, Cat Sitter, Vet, Dog Trainer, Groomer, Rescue or Pet Shop.

But how do you find the best solution for you and your pets? We have put together a list of resources for pet lovers to make this easier for you!

 

Loveland Pet Sitter

Choosing the right pet sitter for your pet can be difficult. You want to ensure your sitter is correct for your household and your pets. Because of that we put together an ebook A Pet Owner’s Guide to Hiring a Pet Sitter or Dog Walker to give you all of the information you need to hire a pet sitter that is a good match for you.

Download our printable checklist on Hiring a Pet Sitter or Dog Walker to help in your search.

To learn more about our pet sitters take a look at our About Us page. To learn about our services, visit our Services page.

If you have a pet sitter and want to make sure you are prepared for your trip, download our Preparing for Your Pet Sitter Checklist.

 

Loveland Dog Walker

Dog walkers are great for dog who have a lot of energy and people who do not have enough time. A dog walk can be nice for a day when you work late, or just cannot get away to take out your pup. To learn about how to hire a dog walker, take a look at our ebook A Pet Owner’s Guide to Hiring a Pet Sitter or Dog Walker. This can guide you through why you may need a dog walker, how they work and how you find one that is a wonderful match for your household.

If you want to learn about the Benefits of Regular Dog Walks, read our recent article. If you want to learn about our dog walking services, take a look at our services page.

 

Pet Supply Stores around Loveland

Loveland is extremely animal friendly, and thus there are a variety of pet supply stores to choose from. We are a huge fan of shopping local whenever possible, and we believe locally-owned stores tend to have better educated employees to give you advice.

We have collected a list of our favorite pet supply stores in town:

A good pet supply store should be able to offer suggestions on products based on your pet’s health needs. Ask some questions and if you do not feel comfortable then try a different store.

 

Loveland Rescues

As such an animal friendly city, Loveland has a wide variety of rescues. It would be impossible to list them all here, but we wanted to provide you the groups that are large and most likely to be able to meet your needs. Whether you want to adopt a new pet or just have questions, these rescues are all great!

Here are the rescues most likely to be of assistance:

If one of these organizations cannot answer your questions, they will refer you to someone who can.

 

Loveland Veterinarians

With Loveland being so CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, we are flush with amazing veterinarians. Choosing a veterinarian that is a good fit for you

Here is a list of veterinarians that we have worked with personally and loved:

If you need help choosing your new veterinarian, read our recent article 5 Tips to Picking a Veterinarian You Love.

 

Loveland Emergency Veterinarians

 

When you have a pet emergency, you want to make sure to get the best care for your animal, no matter what time of day! Emergency vet clinics are open 24/7, 365 days a year and can be a lifesaver when you need one. It is important to know where your closest clinic is so you know where to go right away.

Here are emergency veterinary clinics and their locations:

To see the list with all of the Fort Collins emergency vet clinics, as well as signs of a pet emergency, read our recent article Fort Collins Emergency Vet Clinics.

 

Loveland Dog Trainers

All dogs can use a little training, whether is be the normal sit and stay, or learning how to stop your puppy from chewing on your shoes. Plus training classes can be fun for you and your dog to have some bonding time! Dogs are smart animals and need to use their brains to keep them from getting bored.

We have collected 3 trainers that use positive reinforcement training:

When choosing a dog trainer you want to pick one that works with your dog in a positive and fear-free manner.

 

Loveland Dog-Friendly Hotels

If you are coming to Loveland to visit or if you find yourself needing to stay in a hotel for awhile, you want to have a hotel that is friendly for your dog.

We have made a list of hotels that are dog friendly and wonderful for you!

If you are visiting Loveland and need to leave your dog while you go out for an activity, consider having a pet sitter come stay in your hotel. This will give your dog company and make sure she does not get in any trouble while you are gone. We provide extended stays for these types of trips which you can learn about in our services.

 

Loveland Dog Groomers

A good haircut is important to the health and happiness of your dog. Considerate groomers can make the grooming process as easy as possible.

We have collected a list of groomers that our clients have loved:

If you would like to get tips on how to pick the perfect groomer, read our recent article 5 Places for Dog Grooming in Fort Collins.

 

Self-Service Dog Washes in Loveland

If your dog does not need all the trimmings, it can sometimes be easier to clean them up yourself. It is wonderful to go to a self-service dog wash where you can use their space to get your pup clean without making a mess of your bathroom.

We have collected a list of self-service dog washes in Fort Collins:

To learn more about costs of using a self service dog wash, read our recent article How Much Does it Cost to Use a Self Service Dog Wash?

 

Loveland Catteries

When you are traveling you can either hire a pet sitter or board your cat in a cattery. There are advantages of each, and if you decide to board your cat there are a variety of options.

We have collected a list of catteries in Loveland:

If you are considering hiring a pet sitter, look at advantages of cat sitting and take a look at our services.

 

Dog Boarding Kennels in Loveland

 When leaving town you can either hire a pet sitter or board your dog in a kennel.

We have collected a list of the top places to board your dog in Loveland:

To read more about these dog boarding kennels, take a look at our recent article Top 5 Places to Board Your Dog in Loveland.

If you are considering pet sitting, read our recent article Why Should I Hire a Dog Sitter, and look at our services.

 

Loveland Doggy Daycare

When your dog needs some extra exercise, you have two options:

  1. Send your dog to daycare
  2. Hire a dog walker to exercise your dog

Dog daycare can be great for well socialized dogs who enjoy the company of other dogs. If you are unsure if daycare is a good option, read our recent article Doggy Daycare vs Dog Walker.

If it sounds like your pup would love daycare, we have collected a list of dog daycares in Loveland:

If you are thinking about using a dog walker take a look at our services.

 

Top Pet-Friendly Restaurants in Loveland

During nice weather it can be a bonus to be able to take your dog with you when you go out to eat. In Loveland we have many, many food options to choose from, so you might as well pick one where you can bring your pup!

These are good pet-friendly restaurants in Loveland:

If you would like to learn more about these locations, take a look at 4 Dog Friendly Restaurants in Loveland.

 

Loveland Dog Parks

In Fort Collins, folks love their dogs and we want them to have as much fun as possible! For well-socialized dogs, that can mean a trip to the dog park is a favorite activity.

Here in Loveland we have 2 dogs parks:

 

Loveland Dog-Friendly Hiking Trails

Hiking is one of the most popular hobbies in Colorado, for good reason. The trails are beautiful all year round and there are many where you can bring your furry friend with you.

Four of our favorite Loveland trails are:

  1. The Foothills Trail
  2. The Summit Adventure Trail
  3. Cathy Fromme Prairie
  4. Arthurs Rock Trail

To see all the details about these trails, read our recent article Best Loveland Dog Trails.

 

Do you have a resource you think should be added to the Pet Lovers Guide to Loveland? Let us know via our contact form so we can check it out!

How Do You Handle Dog Confrontations?

 

We walk a lot of dogs that are not friendly towards other dogs, you never know if the dog coming your way is going to be kind. The fact is that many dogs go to dog daycare, unless they do not get along with the other dogs there, in which case we end up walking them.

Wet Noses Pet Sitters also walk a lot of dogs that are super friendly and would love to play with every dog we encounter. We still never know how the other dog is going to react or how the two will get along. It is our primary responsibility to keep our charge safe so we have a very strict rule:

Whenever possible we do not allow our client’s dogs to associate with other dogs. Period.

So what do we do when you spot another dog coming that is off leash?

First we evaluate the situation to see how concerned we should be. Is our dog friendly with other dogs? Does the approaching dog look friendly? Is the owner of the other dog present? If the answer to any of these is no then we are starting to look at options to prevent the dogs from coming into contact.

From here we are going to assume that we feel the need to stop this encounter because we believe it will result in a dog fight. So what now?

We bring our dog in close to us and we yell at the other dog at the top of our lungs.

“No! No! Go Home! Get Away!” We make ourselves look big and threatening and really “unfun” to be around. Hopefully the dog decides to go another way.

Call for the owner of the other dog if you can spot them.

We yell “My dog hates other dogs! My dog bites!” This will encourage even the most lazy or unconcerned dog owner to try to collect their dog. It does not matter if my dog is the biggest teddy bear and would not hurt a fly.

If the dog keeps coming then the next step depends on our dog.

For little dogs, this is the time to just scoop up the dog and move away. If our dog is big and friendly then we try to shuffle away from the other dog, keeping ourselves between them. If our dog is big and not dog friendly then putting ourselves between the dogs can put us in danger.

When these two dogs are bound to meet and there is nothing we can do about it then we loosen the leash, or drop it if needed, and put on our most friendly voice.

“Hello sweet puppies, don’t you both want to be the best of friends?” A happy voice goes a long way to diffusing a situation. So why loosen the leash? Most of dog communication is done via body language and if I am tugging on the leash I am making my dog more tense and messing up their communication. No need for a dog fight because of a miscommunication. Worst case scenario there is a fight and I do not want my dog to be impeded by a leash. The truth is many dog fights end with just a scuffle and no actual damage, even if it sounds terrible.

If there is a dog fight we do our best to safely break it up.

We do not reach into a fight as that is the best way to get bit. We use items to put in between them or if the fight is one sided we distract the aggressor. Breaking up a dog fight is a blog in and of itself!

Thankfully we very rarely end up with a fight on our hands. Usually by going through the first few steps we manage to avoid any problems. If a problem does arise we are prepared and know exactly what to do!

How Do I Pay for My Appointment?

 

At Wet Noses Pet Sitting we try to make everything as easy as possible! You have enough on your mind with work and planning your trips and our sitters are working with your pets. We do not want our sitters to have to worry about payment instead of your pets.

We use a fantastic system for setting appointments and keeping all of the details we need to provide amazing care. Before reserving an appointment, you will need to add a credit card. We take Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express. We are not able to see your credit card information and the system stores it safely. On the first day of your trip, or the beginning of your dog walk appointment, your credit card will be charged for the full amount.You do not have to worry about payment and our sitters do not have to think about collecting it!

 

Do You Charge Extra for Multiple Pets?

 

Colorado is a very pet-friendly area and many households have multiple pets. This can mean when looking for pet care it can be a bit harder. If you are boarding dogs, there is an increased price for the more you have. The same for cats. Not to mention the stress of needing to transport them to a facility, or to different places if you have different types of animals. For those of you who have large pet households, pet sitters may be your only real option when going out of town.

So how much extra will it be for multiple pets?

In general our rates include two pets, but we evaluate each household individually. A household with three dogs that need to be walked separately is very different from a house with one dog and two mice. We find out the number of pets you have as well as their routine and levels of care, and provide you a rate based on your entire household. When we do charge extra, it is generally $2 per pet.

What animals cost more?

We do charge a bit extra for exotic animals that require specific experience, such as horses and parrots. Learn more about what exotic pets we watch. This is because we need to have sitters on staff with a more broad experience level than an average sitter.

How Does Overnight Pet Sitting Work?

For people who have never used a pet sitter, the idea of having overnight pet sitting can be a little daunting! Here we try to explain everything you need to know so you can decide if overnight pet sitting is right for you and your fur kids.

How Long are Overnight Stays?

At Wet Noses Pet Sitting, we offer two different overnights:

  • Standard Overnight which is 9-10 hours long
  • Extended Overnight which is 12 hours long, usually 7pm-7am

In most cases, unless you have a dog door or only have cats, we also require a visit during the day. We can help you choose visits that are best for you.

What Animals Need Overnight Stays?

We most commonly see overnight stays being used for dogs, but that is not to say that some cats do not appreciate them! If you have pets that are used to, and enjoy, company in the evenings, then overnights would be a good fit. You also may have pets that need to monitored more closely due to heath problems, or are young and exuberant and need more exercise! I have an older cat that likes to sleep on the bed next to a person, so even when we take the dog with us, we still get an overnight sitter.

What Happens During an Overnight Stay?

Depending on whether you chose a Standard or Extended Overnight, the sitter will have varying amounts of time.

  • During a Standard Overnight, the sitter will have enough time for feeding, medications and a quick walk. The same basic activities that happen during a pet sitting visit.
  • During an Extended Overnight, the sitters usually arrive between 7-8pm. This allows them time for playtime, a longer walk, plant watering and extra cuddling! During these longer overnights the sitter will generally spend the extra time hanging out with your pets and keeping them company. For households with a lot of pets, this extra time also allows the sitter to perform any additional tasks that are hard to complete during the day visits.

Where Does the Sitter Sleep?

The sitter can sleep wherever you are comfortable, but we often recommend that the sitter sleep in the room your animals are most accustomed to. The sitter can sleep in your bed, in a guest room or on a comfortable couch. Some animals do not mind where your sitter sleeps, but if you have a dog or a cat that has a specific routine, you should consider sticking with the normal bedroom.

Some clients will wash the sheets before leaving, especially for longer trips. Then the sitter will wash the sheets before you return. Some sitters prefer to bring their own bedding. These are details you can work out with your sitter during the introductory meeting.

Still Having Trouble Deciding?

We have written up suggested schedules depending on what pets you have. Shy cats have very different needs than active dogs. Or Call Us to discuss schedules based on the specific needs of your pets!

Do You Charge Extra for Holidays?

 

This question is easy! We do not charge extra for holidays. That is our gift to you!

Many companies charge extra for holidays, either just for the day or for the entire week. Truth be told, we used to charge extra. We found that it made us feel crummy so we did away with it. We know that the holidays can be a costly time, with buying presents and travel expenses. We do not want to make it worse.

Your sitter

Since we do not charge extra for the holidays, your sitter does not make more than a normal day. Our wonderful sitters give up their times with family and friends to make sure your pets are getting the best care while you are gone. Should you be feeling generous, feel free to tip your sitters extra for working during the holidays!

5 Questions to Ask Your Vet at Your Next Visit

 

When you’re getting ready for your yearly physical, you probably have a few questions prepared for your doctor. And it’s smart to have them prepared ahead of time. Because if you’re like me, by time you’re in the back room, chances are you’ll forget to ask at least one thing you were concerned about.

The same should go for your pet at their regular wellness checks as well. There are just as many, if not more distractions at the vet. Sometimes that leaves you floundering for words and just hoping to get out unscathed.

Having a few good questions jotted down for easy reference will go a long way in making you get the most out of your pet’s vet visit.

1. Is my pet overweight?

Being on top of your pet’s weight is important. According to the Association for Pet Obesity and Prevention, more than half of the dogs and cats are overweight in the U.S. Even though we are almost conditioned to think “a fat pet is a happy pet,” that’s not true. Obesity sets them up for a whole slew of complications such as, diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and more.

2. What is the best food for my pet?

This question almost goes hand in hand with the weight question, but it is still beneficial for average weight pets as well. Not all pet food is created equal and some foods have fatty fillers and sub-par ingredients. Tell your vet what food you regularly feed your pet. Also, as they age dietary needs can change. Ask them what they feel is an appropriate diet for them considering their age and weight.

3. Do you have any recommendations for flea/tick meds?

Flea and ticks are not just a problem for the spring and summer. They can actually be a threat all year round. More than just a nuisance, they can transmit deadly diseases too. Depending on the time of year and your pet’s health in general, your vet may have a better way of protecting your pet.

4.Does my pet need a dental cleaning?

Often forgotten, but still very important is dental health. Recent surveys state that an estimated 80% of adult dogs and 70% of adult cats suffer from a least some degree of periodontal disease. If dental hygiene is ignored too long, it can result serious health issues with the liver, kidney, heart. Your vet should have some easy and painless ways to help.

5. Is this normal?

This is the general behavior or health question to ask your vet. It’s whatever may concern you about your pet. Like do they have a quirky behavior, a weird eating/sleeping habit? Or you may be worried about lumps or bumps on their skin. Reserve this question to fit what concerns you about your pet specifically.


A little bit of planning goes a long way in making sure you get all the answers you need. Doctors and vet visits are stressful enough as it is, no need to add stress to it by being unprepared.

Do you have any additional questions you like to ask your vet? Let us know in the comments!