Posts

How to Catch a Loose Dog

 

Hopefully you are looking at this post because you are curious about what to do if your dogs gets loose. In the best case scenario, your dog is safe and sound by your side and you are going to take some time to practice the techniques in this podcast so you are prepared if your dog ever does get loose. I hope that is the case. We have some great ideas that will not work for all dogs, but something in here will work, so it is best to try them out and see what is successful. If your dog is missing (not where you can see him), take a look at the links below and our previous podcast on how to find a missing pet.
CLICK HERE to Subscribe to our Podcast
CLICK HERE to read our blog and watch the video on How to Catch a Loose Dog
CLICK HERE to find out How to Find a Missing Pet

How to Find a Missing Pet

 

Next week is Take Your Dog to Work Week so it is time to get prepared! Taking your dog to work can be fun and extremely rewarding, but you need to prepare in advance to make sure the day goes smoothly and you are still able to get some work done. Today we discuss how to decide if it is a good idea to take your dog to work, how to prepare beforehand and what to do on the special day to make sure it goes smoothly!
CLICK HERE to Subscribe to our Podcast
CLICK HERE to see How to Find a Missing Pet in Larimer County

How to Identify a Puppy Mill

 

We all love puppies but if you are thinking of adding a new pup to your household, you want to be sure it is from a rescue or from a good dog breeder, not a puppy mill. Sometimes it can be hard to tell if a puppy is from a puppy mill, so today we talk about the signs and what to look for in a good dog breeder.
CLICK HERE to Subscribe to our Podcast
CLICK HERE for Steps for Finding a Good Dog Breeder
CLICK HERE to Learn How to Socialize Your New Puppy
CLICK HERE for Cheap Puppy Toys You Can Make at Home
CLICK HERE to download a Complete Checklist for New Dog Owners

How to Safely Take Your Dog to Work

 

Next week is Take Your Dog to Work Week so it is time to get prepared! Taking your dog to work can be fun and extremely rewarding, but you need to prepare in advance to make sure the day goes smoothly and you are still able to get some work done. Today we discuss how to decide if it is a good idea to take your dog to work, how to prepare beforehand and what to do on the special day to make sure it goes smoothly!
CLICK HERE to Subscribe to our Podcast
CLICK HERE to read our blog with tips on taking your dog to work
CLICK HERE for Pro Tips to Use Kong Toys

Best Dog and Cat Quotes

 

“Everything I know I learned from dogs.” – Nora Roberts

 

“Dogs do speak, but only to those who know how to listen.”– Orhan Pamuk

 

“Dogs’ lives are too short. Their only fault, really.” – Agnes Sligh Turnbull

 

“Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.” – Roger Caras

 

“Some of my best leading men have been dogs and horses.” – Elizabeth Taylor

 

“The better I get to know men, the more I find myself loving dogs.” – Charles De Gaulle

 

“Dogs never bite me. Just humans.” – Marilyn Monroe

“I am fond of pigs. Dogs look up to us. Cats look down on us. Pigs treat us as equals.” – Winston Churchill

 

“If you don’t own a dog, at least one, there is not necessarily anything wrong with you, but there may be something wrong with your life.” – Roger A. Caras

 

“If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man.” – Mark Twain

 

“Reason No. 106 why dogs are smarter than humans: Once you leave the litter, you sever contact with your mothers.” – Jodi Picoult

 

“What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight; it’s the size of the fight in the dog.” – Dwight D Eisenhower

 

“My father… was a man who understood all dogs thoroughly and treated them like human beings.” – Flann O’Brien

 

“A dog teaches a boy fidelity, perseverance, and to turn around three times before lying down.” – Josh Billings

 

“Until one has loved an animal a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.”

 

“I wish I could write as mysterious as a cat.” – Edgar Allen Poe

 

“One small cat changes coming home to an empty house to coming home.” – Pam Brown

 

“The love of a dog is a pure thing. He gives you a trust which is total. You must not betray it.” – Michel Houellebecq

 

“A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more than he loves himself.” – Josh Billings

 

“Who ever said that Diamonds are a girl’s best friend, never owned a dog.”

 

“Money can buy you a fine dog, but only love can make him wag his tail.” – Kinky Friedman

 

“As wonderful as dogs can be, they are famous for missing the point.” – Jean Ferris

 

“Happiness is a warm puppy.” – Charles Shultz

 

“Did you know that there are over 300 words for love in canine?” – Gabriel Zevin

 

“If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.” – Will Rogers

 

“You can usually tell that a man is good if he has a dog who loves him.” – W. Bruce Cameron

 

“I don’t understand people who don’t touch their pets. Their cat or dog is called a pet for a reason.” – Jarod Kintz

 

“When an 85-pound mammal licks your tears away, then tries to sit on your lap, it’s hard to feel sad.” – Kristan Higgins

 

“I think dogs are the most amazing creatures; they give unconditional love. For me, they are the role model for being alive.” – Gilda Radner

 

“The dog has seldom been successful in pulling man up to its level of sagacity, but man has frequently dragged the dog down to his.” – James Thurber

 

“The greatest fear dogs know is the fear that you will not come back when you go out the door without them.” – Stanley Coren

 

 

“Dogs are wise. They crawl away into a quiet corner and lick their wounds and do not rejoin the world until they are whole once more.” – Agatha Cristie

 

“My dog is half pit-bull, half poodle. Not much of a watchdog, but a vicious gossip.” – Craig Shoemaker

 

“Every dog must have his day.” – Jonathan Swift

 

“Anybody who doesn’t know what soap tastes like never washed a dog.” – Franklin P. Jones

 

“The dog is a gentleman; I hope to go to his heaven not man’s.” – Mark Twain

 

“The average dog is a nicer person than the average person.” ~ Andy Rooney

 

“Time spent with cats is never wasted.” – Sigmund Freud

 

“Kisses are a better fate than wisdom.” – EE Cummings

 

“A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more than he loves himself.” – Josh Billings

 

“To his dog, every man is Napoleon; hence the constant popularity of dogs.” – Aldous Huxley

 

“Cats are inquisitive, but hate to admit it.” ~ Mason Cooley

 

“I have studied many philosophers and many cats. The wisdom of cats is infinitely superior.” ~ Hippolyte Taine

 

“There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.” – Albert Schweitzer

 

“I believe cats to be spirits come to earth. A cat, I am sure, could walk on a cloud without coming through.” – Jules Verne

 

“It doesn’t matter if a cat is black or white, so long as it catches mice.” – Deng Xiaoping

 

 

What Pet Sitting Visits Do I Need For My Diabetic Dog or Cat?

Are you going out of town but have a dog or cat with diabetes? There are a lot of factors to consider before you even decide to go on vacation. We want to walk you through these points of concern and discuss when you should make the choice to stay in town and skip that vacation instead. If you decide it is ok to leave, then we have a list of suggestions for pet sitting schedules that we have found work out well for diabetic pets. All pets need amazing care, but without an educated and precise pet sitter, it can be easy for a diabetic pet to become ill.

Should You Travel?

We are always happy to help out, but there are some factors that need to be considered with diabetic pets before you make the decision to go on a vacation.

  • How long since your pet was diagnosed with diabetes? In the early days after diagnoses, you are trying to get your pet’s glucose levels stable. You are often speaking to your vet regularly and adjusting medication levels. This can be hard for a pet sitter to take on.
  • Is your pet stable? Meaning are you still needing to adjust medication often and watch your pet’s behavior for concerns?
  • How is your pet accepting the insulin injections and glucose testing? If it is hard for you, it will be harder for a sitter.
  • How is your pet about being handled by strangers? If your pet does not love being handled (especially cats) then it is going to be tough for a sitter to medicate your pet and do glucose testing.
  • Does your pet have any problems eating when you are gone? Pets need to eat before receiving their insulin so if your pet typically does not eat when you are gone then it is going to be hard for a sitter to manage the food and insulin levels consistently.
  • Are you going to be reachable on your trip? Whenever there is a problem with a pet, especially a pet with medical problems, we are going to reach out to you for suggestions and ideas. If you are not going to be reachable it will be hard for a sitter to determine the next course of action.

If you are seeing multiple points of concern, then you should consider waiting to travel until your pet is more stable. We are concerned for both your pet, who is not feeling well already, and the safety of the sitter who will be handling your pet in close quarters. If you think this is a good time to travel then we have multiple steps to make sure it goes smoothly!

How do You Prepare to Leave Your Diabetic Pet?

So you are going to travel and want to make sure it goes as well as possible. So do we! Here is what a sitter will need so you can have the best trip:

  • All the data from your veterinarian. All of it. This can include: normal and abnormal glucose levels, amount of insulin to be given, length of time after eating to give insulin, size of normal meal, what to do if your pet does not eat, any abnormal behaviors to watch out for, etc. The more information you give your sitter, the more educated decisions she can make.
  • Feeding instructions with contingencies. It is not unusual for animals to not eat if they are stressed or not feeling well. If your dog does not eat or your cat hides during a visit, think about what your sitter should do. Do you want the sitter to stay longer (and you pay for the extra time)? Should the sitter leave and come back? Can the sitter mix in some canned food or feed a different food altogether to get your pet to eat? We have been known to sit on the floor and hand feed pets if that is helpful, we just need to know what you think is best.
  • Normal animal behaviors. When your pet is not feeling well, what does she do? The better the list you make, the more we can look for.
  • How to reach you. We try to solve problems ourselves, but we never want to mess with the health of a pet. We like to be able to reach you if we have concerns, especially if you are a new client or your pet is recently diagnosed with diabetes.
  • How to reach your vet, and permission for us to speak to them. You need to let know veterinarian know you will be out of town and who will be caring for your pets. If we cannot reach you, or the situation is urgent, we need to be able to reach a veterinarian quickly and not have to worry about any privacy issues.

If your are unsure of how your pet will do with a sitter – have some trial visits. At Wet Noses Pet Sitting, we require a trial visit for any cat receiving medication. We recommend it for dogs, but only require it is the dog seems nervous during the meet and greet. During a trial visit, you will leave and your sitter will come just like you are on vacation. This will allow us all to observe how your animal reacts to a new person handling them and allows us to flush out any questions your sitter may have.

If you know your pet will have a hard time – schedule multiple trial visits! We are happy to come work with you for as long as it takes to get your dog or cat comfortable with us. We want everyone to be relaxed and have peace of mind when you do leave.

If you can prepare all of this, then you can travel comfortably, knowing that your pet will be well cared for. Now you just need to decide on a schedule! Unlike other pets, diabetic pets need medication every 12 hours, so our suggested schedules are built with that in mind.

Diabetic Pet Option #1

This is an ideal schedule for pets who need eyes on them regularly.

 

30 Minute Mid-Day Visit 

Your sitter will use this visit for a walk and/or playtime. It is a good time during the day just to check on your pet and make sure she is feeling ok. If you have a dog, this visit should be set at a time when your dog would normally need to go outside, so it is in line with her normal routine. A visit during the middle of the day like this means that your dog will only be alone for 6-7 hours, depending on the time of the visit. 

12 Hour Extended Overnight Stay 

A 12 hour overnight means your sitter will feed your pet and give insulin at the beginning and end of the stay. Your sitter will arrive in the early evening (around 7 pm) and take your dog for a walk or playtime (if you have one), whichever is normal for her. Then comes feeding and some time for relaxation. Right before bed, your dog goes out for the last outing, usually a potty break. Your sitter sends you a picture with an update so you can rest easy knowing your pup has company. In the morning there is time for another walk or playtime and feeding, as well as other pet chores. The Extended Overnight Stay is especially good for dogs and cats who are accustomed to having company and companionship during the evenings or if you have a large number of pets needing care. 

 

Diabetic Pet Option #2

This is a good schedule for pets who are used to being home alone in the evening but like having company overnight.

 

30 Minute Dinner Visit

Your sitter arrives ready for a walk (if you have a dog) and dinner time! Your pets will be happy to see her after a day apart, so there is usually some happy greeting time followed by a trip outside to go potty for dogs. This visit will be scheduled during the time that your pet needs her evening insulin. After dogs get their evening walk, or cats have playtime, it is time for dinner and medication. Your sitter sends you a picture with an update so you can rest easy knowing your pet has company. Before leaving, your sitter turns on some lights so your pets are not alone in the dark, and to make your home appear lived in.

9-10 Hour Regular Overnight Stay 

Your sitter will arrive in the evening (around 10 pm) and let your dog out for a potty break. Your sitter then settles your pup in for their normal bedtime routine. Maybe your dog sleeps in the bed with your sitter, or on a dog bed in the bedroom. If your dog needs a tuck in with a blanket or a late night treat, that will happen. In the morning there is time for a let out or a quick walk and feeding. Before leaving, your sitter will set your pup up for the day with her normal routine, including breakfast and medication. The overnight stay is especially good for dogs who are accustomed to having company and companionship overnight, and provides a level of consistency that dogs appreciate. It also allows your sitter to keep an eye on your pet’s behavior for any changes that indicate she is not feeling well.

Diabetic Pet Option #3

This is a good schedule for pets who are fine with being home alone overnight.

 

30 Minute Breakfast Visit

Your sitter will arrive in the morning (between 7-8:30am) and take your dog for a walk or playtime, whichever is normal for her. It is an exciting time to get up and stretch our legs first thing in the morning! Cats gets some cuddles and playtime, whatever they like. Then comes feeding, medication and other normal chores. Before leaving your sitter will set your pup up for the day with her normal routine, whether it be a stuffed kong or leaving a radio on.

30 Minute Late Afternoon Visit

Your sitter arrives ready for a walk and playtime! Your pup will be happy to see her after a day apart, so there is usually some happy greeting time followed by a trip outside to go potty. Then they are off for their walk or playtime outside, depending on what your dog prefers. Your sitter sends you a picture with an update so you can rest easy knowing your pup has company. Before leaving, your sitter turns on some lights so your dog in not alone in the dark, and to make your home appear lived in.

15-30 Minute Night Visit

This visit should be timed to be 12 hours apart from your breakfast visit. The sitter will take dogs out for a last minute potty break and then feeding and medication. It allows your pup to close out the day comfortable and secure. Your sitter will let your pup out and settle her in for the night with her normal routine. At the end it is lights out and time for sleep!

 

Our Considerations for all Pets

For dogs and cats, there are a few factors we like to consider when setting a schedule:

  • All diabetic pets need visits spaced 12 hours apart for insulin, so we stick to that when scheduling.
  • How long is your dog used to being home during the day? Do you work a full dog or do you work from home?
  • How often does your dog go outside during a normal day? It is easy to under-estimate so try counting for a few days to be sure.
  • Does your dog need a lot of exercise? If so, consider schedules for active dogs.
  • Where do your pets sleep at night? If your dog waits for you to go to bed and then joins you, you need overnight stays. If your dog wanders off at 9pm and you don’t see her again until 7am, you can probably get away with just visits, if you want.
  • For you – are you more comfortable having someone active around the house? If so, then you want an Extended Overnight.

Time to Customize!

We want to work with you to set up the best possible schedule for your dog, so you are all happy during your trip. We also know that each home is different, and a lot of people have more than just one dog!

After you have the basic idea of your schedule we sit down to figure out the nitty-gritty:

  • Are there any other pets in the home that need feeding, medication, etc? We make sure your visit has enough time to get everything done.
  • We like to allow enough time for feeding, changing water, walks and some cuddles (if your dog is so inclined).
  • There needs to be enough time to clean out food and water bowls, clean up any messes, toys, etc.
  • Many people who love animals, also love plants! Normal visits have time for a small bit of plant watering. If you have beautiful summer gardens, then we need to see how long they take to the water and add that on to your normal visits.
  • On your normal schedule, we can complete household tasks like bringing in the newspaper, collecting the mail, turning lights off and on and taking out the trash.
  • Do you want updates every visit? Many clients do, just keep in mind that your sitter will take 5+ minutes to send an update and that is time during your visit not focused on your pets.
  • It will take a sitter a bit longer to get the work done then it takes you, especially if you have extensive routines for your pets and home. You have had years to perfect your system! We always try to make sure your pet sitter will have enough time for everything so she will not feel stressed and your pets will receive the focus they deserve.

Work With Us to Keep Your Pets Healthy While You are Gone!

Why Should I Hire a Dog Sitter?

 

When you leave town, deciding what to do with your dog can be a challenge. Should you hire a dog sitter? Should you board your dog? Or should you find a kind friend to step in?

Hiring a dog sitter has a variety of benefits:

  • Dogs appreciate routine and their own space. A dog sitter allows your pup to stay home where she is comfortable and familiar with her surroundings and routine.
  • Dog sitters can spend one-on-one time with your dog, often as much time as you normally would.
  • Your dog is not exposed to other dogs or diseases that can frequent boarding kennels.
  • Sitters will notice any changes in behavior quickly and can pick up on any health concerns.

Schedules

If you are considering hiring a dog sitter, no matter what sitter you use, we have a list of ideas for schedules. The schedule for your dog depends on your dog’s personality and finding the right one is important to keep her happy and healthy.

Questions?

If you are curious about our services or animal care in general, feel free to contact us! We are very active on social media and you can find up on Facebook Live some mornings at 8:30am MST talking about animal care. Join us!

 

What Pet Sitting Visits Do I Need For My Dog?

 

Are you going out of town but are worried about your dog? There are a lot of choices for pet care and for scheduling and it can be hard to know where to start. Over the years we have had a variety of schedules and we have been able to see what works best for dogs with different personalities. Here are our top 3 schedules for pet sitting visits that we have found to work well. Of course, these can all be tweaked for your household, this just gives you a place to start!

Dog Option #1

This is an ideal schedule for dogs who are used to people home in the evening.

 

30 Minute Mid-Day Visit 

Your sitter will use this visit for a walk and/or playtime. This visit should be set at a time when your dog would normally need to go outside, so it is in line with her normal routine. A visit during the middle of the day like this means that your dog will only be alone for 6-7 hours, depending on the time of the visit. 

12 Hour Extended Overnight Stay 

Your sitter will arrive in the early evening (around 7 pm) and take your dog for a walk or playtime, whichever is normal for her. Then comes feeding and some time for relaxation. Right before bed, your dog goes out for the last outing, usually a potty break. Your sitter sends you a picture with an update so you can rest easy knowing your pup has company. In the morning there is time for another walk or playtime and feeding, as well as other pet chores. The Extended Overnight Stay is especially good for dogs who are accustomed to having company and companionship during the evenings or if you have a large number of pets needing care. 

 

 

Dog Option #2

This is a good schedule for dogs who are used to being home alone in the evening but like having company overnight.

 

30 Minute Dinner Visit

Your sitter arrives ready for a walk and dinner time! Your pup will be happy to see her after a day apart, so there is usually some happy greeting time followed by a trip outside to go potty. Then they are off for their walk or playtime outside, depending on what your dog prefers. After getting that energy out, it is time for dinner. Your sitter sends you a picture with an update so you can rest easy knowing your pup has company. Before leaving, your sitter turns on some lights so your dog in not alone in the dark, and to make your home appear lived in.

9-10 Hour Regular Overnight Stay 

Your sitter will arrive in the evening (around 10 pm) and let your dog out for a potty break. Your sitter then settles your pup in for their normal bedtime routine. Maybe your dog sleeps in the bed with your sitter, or on a dog bed in the bedroom. If your dog needs a tuck in with a blanket or a late night treat, that will happen. In the morning there is time for a let out or a quick walk and feeding. Before leaving, your sitter will set your pup up for the day with her normal routine. The overnight stay is especially good for dogs who are accustomed to having company and companionship overnight, and provides a level of consistency that dogs appreciate. 

 

Dog Option #3

This is a good schedule for dogs who are fine with being home alone overnight.

 

30 Minute Breakfast Visit

Your sitter will arrive in the morning (between 7-8:30am) and take your dog for a walk or playtime, whichever is normal for her. It is an exciting time to get up and stretch our legs first thing in the morning! Then comes feeding and other normal chores. Before leaving your sitter will set your pup up for the day with her normal routine, whether it be a stuffed kong or leaving a radio on.

30 Minute Dinner Visit

Your sitter arrives ready for a walk and dinner time! Your pup will be happy to see her after a day apart, so there is usually some happy greeting time followed by a trip outside to go potty. Then they are off for their walk or playtime outside, depending on what your dog prefers. After getting that energy out, it is time for dinner. Your sitter sends you a picture with an update so you can rest easy knowing your pup has company. Before leaving, your sitter turns on some lights so your dog in not alone in the dark, and to make your home appear lived in.

15 Minute Late Night Visit

Last minute trips out a necessary for a healthy dog bladder and brain. It allows your pup to close out the day comfortable and secure. Your sitter will let your pup out and settle her in for the night with her normal routine. At the end it is lights out and time for sleep!

 

Our Considerations for Dogs

For dogs, there are a few factors we like to consider when setting a schedule;

  • How long is your dog used to being home during the day? Do you work a full dog or do you work from home?
  • How often does your dog go outside during a normal day? It is easy to under-estimate so try counting for a few days to be sure.
  • Does your dog need a lot of exercise? If so, consider schedules for active dogs.
  • Where does your dog sleep at night? If your dog waits for you to go to bed and then joins you, you need overnight stays. If your dog wanders off at 9pm and you don’t see her again until 7am, you can probably get away with just visits, if you want.
  • For you – are you more comfortable having someone active around the house? If so, then you want an Extended Overnight.

Time to Customize!

We want to work with you to set up the best possible schedule for your dog, so you are all happy during your trip. We also know that each home is different, and a lot of people have more than just one dog!

After you have the basic idea of your schedule we sit down to figure out the nitty-gritty:

  • Are there any other pets in the home that need feeding, medication, etc? We make sure your visit has enough time to get everything done.
  • We like to allow enough time for feeding, changing water, walks and some cuddles (if your dog is so inclined).
  • There needs to be enough time to clean out food and water bowls, clean up any messes, toys, etc.
  • Many people who love animals, also love plants! Normal visits have time for a small bit of plant watering. If you have beautiful summer gardens, then we need to see how long they take to the water and add that on to your normal visits.
  • On your normal schedule, we can complete household tasks like bringing in the newspaper, collecting the mail, turning lights off and on and taking out the trash.
  • Do you want updates every visit? Many clients do, just keep in mind that your sitter will take 5+ minutes to send an update and that is time during your visit not focused on your pets.
  • It will take a sitter a bit longer to get the work done then it takes you, especially if you have extensive routines for your pets and home. You have had years to perfect your system! We always try to make sure your pet sitter will have enough time for everything so she will not feel stressed and your pets will receive the focus they deserve.

Work With Us to Keep Your Dog Happy While You are Gone!

Why Does My Dog Not Like Walking In The Rain?

 

My three year old loves playing in the rain and jumping in puddles. But do you know who doesn’t love being in the rain? Our dog Rigsby. He hates going out in the rain, even to potty; that means taking a walk in the rain is absolutely out of the question.

So, why do so many dogs hate walking in the rain? We’ve compiled a few reasons why and ways to help get them out during rainy days.

 

  • Pelted Coats & Soggy Paws

Sometimes the reason is as simple as your dog doesn’t like the damp outdoors. Dogs coats are very sensitive. If you notice a dog getting rained on you can see their fur twitching, which has to be pretty annoying for them. Same goes for your dog’s paws. I mean, do you like walking on the wet ground in bare feet? I didn’t think so. Between the rain on their backs and the water on the ground, walking in the rain can be a pretty miserable experience for your dog.

 

  • Thunderstorm Phobias

A lot of times rain mean thunder and lightning. Animals have the knack for sensing storms before we even know they are coming. When dogs with storm phobias sense the change in the air and barometric pressure, the anxiety starts to creep up. A dog with storm phobia shouldn’t be forced to go outside because it may make it worse. Some dogs have a natural predisposition to have anxiety, others have had traumatic experiences with loud noises. But for the most part, there is no telling why your dog has thunderstorm phobias. All you can do is work with them and help them through it. 

 

  • How You Can Help

Rain happens and sometimes for days at a time. Your dog will still need to get out and use the potty at some point. Luckily there are some great products out there to help your dog through the distaste and fear of the rain.

Doggy Anti-Anxiety Stress Reducing Jacket 

Image from Amazon

Help your dog stay calm with this stress-reducing jacket. Similar to swaddling a baby, this jacket helps comfort your dog when they are feeling anxious.

Storm Stress Relaxing Drops for Dogs

 

Stress from storms, hurricanes or even strong wind can be reduced with these drops.

 

Dog Boots 

Keep their paws dry during the storm and even in the snow with these cute little dog boots.

Transparent Umbrella with Leash

Avoid the pelting rain with this cute leash umbrella combo. Perfect for the rainy and snowy days.

 

Waking in the rain doesn’t have to be a terrible experience for you and your dog. With a better understanding and a few good tools, there is sunshine at the end of the storm!

Why Does My Dog Not Like New Year’s Eve?

If you are asking yourself this question, then you’ve probably had a traumatizing experience with Fido while watching the Times Square ball drop at midnight. If you’re like most people, New Year’s Eve is a night filled with lots of family, friends, fun, and noise. LOTS of noise. Though the noise may not bother you, your dog’s hearing is four times better than yours. Their natural instinct is to RUN.

One minute you’re cuddling with Fido and the next he is nowhere to be found. He most likely ran outside or hid under the bed, searching for a secure place to hide. While you’re frantically running around looking for your precious pooch, you get a knock on the door from your neighbor saying they found him wandering in their front yard. You think to yourself, “I’m so lucky I found you”.

If you can relate to this scenario, your dog most likely does not like New Year’s Eve.

A few reasons your dog doesn’t like New Year’s Eve

  • Decorations

See those streamers, balloons and party hats? They may be fun for you, but for Fido? Not so much. He may be scared and not recognize you. This may lead to a change in behavior and his reactivity to you. If he shows signs of fear, take the hat off and reassure your pup that everything will be okay.

  • Loud Noises

Noise makers, cheering and laughter are all part of the New Year’s Eve festivities. These are all scary noises for Fido. You may find him trembling and whining in fear. Ask your guests to bring the noise down a notch, and put your dog in a separate room with the TV or radio on.

  • Crowds

Is it your turn to host the annual New Year’s Eve party? Whether you are hosting a huge party, or it’s a group of your closest friends, these people are getting in your dog’s personal space. Large crowds are scary and Fido may react adversely. If your dog is not a social creature, spare him the anxiety and put him in a separate room.

  • Fireworks

Are your neighbors the type to set off fireworks in the middle of the street and make a huge commotion? If you answered yes, this may be why Fido is shaking uncontrollably while you “ooh” and “ah” at the light show. Fireworks are some of the scariest, loudest noises for dogs. Turn up the TV and keep your furry friend in a secure kennel or bedroom. If you have the opportunity to, try to stroke his back while you reassuringly hold him.

The reasons mentioned above may just be the tip of the iceberg to why your dog does not like New Year’s Eve. Just remember, while you’re excited and ready to ring in the New Year, keep your furry friend in mind!