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Why Does My Dog Not Like New Year’s Eve?

If you are asking yourself this question, then you’ve probably had a traumatizing experience with Fido while watching the Times Square ball drop at midnight. If you’re like most people, New Year’s Eve is a night filled with lots of family, friends, fun, and noise. LOTS of noise. Though the noise may not bother you, your dog’s hearing is four times better than yours. Their natural instinct is to RUN.

One minute you’re cuddling with Fido and the next he is nowhere to be found. He most likely ran outside or hid under the bed, searching for a secure place to hide. While you’re frantically running around looking for your precious pooch, you get a knock on the door from your neighbor saying they found him wandering in their front yard. You think to yourself, “I’m so lucky I found you”.

If you can relate to this scenario, your dog most likely does not like New Year’s Eve.

A few reasons your dog doesn’t like New Year’s Eve

  • Decorations

See those streamers, balloons and party hats? They may be fun for you, but for Fido? Not so much. He may be scared and not recognize you. This may lead to a change in behavior and his reactivity to you. If he shows signs of fear, take the hat off and reassure your pup that everything will be okay.

  • Loud Noises

Noise makers, cheering and laughter are all part of the New Year’s Eve festivities. These are all scary noises for Fido. You may find him trembling and whining in fear. Ask your guests to bring the noise down a notch, and put your dog in a separate room with the TV or radio on.

  • Crowds

Is it your turn to host the annual New Year’s Eve party? Whether you are hosting a huge party, or it’s a group of your closest friends, these people are getting in your dog’s personal space. Large crowds are scary and Fido may react adversely. If your dog is not a social creature, spare him the anxiety and put him in a separate room.

  • Fireworks

Are your neighbors the type to set off fireworks in the middle of the street and make a huge commotion? If you answered yes, this may be why Fido is shaking uncontrollably while you “ooh” and “ah” at the light show. Fireworks are some of the scariest, loudest noises for dogs. Turn up the TV and keep your furry friend in a secure kennel or bedroom. If you have the opportunity to, try to stroke his back while you reassuringly hold him.

The reasons mentioned above may just be the tip of the iceberg to why your dog does not like New Year’s Eve. Just remember, while you’re excited and ready to ring in the New Year, keep your furry friend in mind!

 

How to Keep Your Dog Busy When the Kids Go Back to School

 

It’s been a nice long summer of cuddles in the morning and playing in the afternoon. The home has been bustling with activity while the kids are out of school. And typically, most of our dogs love all of the extra attention they get during this time. That’s why it can be hard for them to adjust when it’s time for the kids to go back to school.

back to schoolGet them a few new toys dog

Help your dog get over the school day slump with new activities to keep them occupied.

  • Puzzle toys are great at keeping dog’s entertained. Not only do they challenge their brains for a reward, they also stay busy for a while as well. After playing with it, they feel satisfied from play and getting a treat
  • Dog chews will help save your shoes and furniture if your dog is really feeling the back to school blues. Often our dogs find themselves chewing when they are stressed or bored. Giving them new chews can help them ease their anxiety and boredom.
  • Tug Poles are a fun way to interact with your dog. They look similar to the familiar cat fishing pole toy, but a little tougher and more durable. Take some time each to hop it around and play with your dog to put back some fun in their day.
  • Ball launchers are also a great way to keep your dog busy when the kids go back to school. Whether it’s automatic or the chuck-it launcher, dogs love playing ball.

 

Tire them out with exercise

You won’t have to worry about your dog being bored if they are too pooped to play. Wear them out a good walk or a vigorous play session before you leave or have to start your chores. They’ll happily nap for a little while, then you can get your daily tasks completed without them begging for attention.

Turn on TV or Radio

It can get too quiet during the day, especially being used to a busy household. Help your dog through the quiet times by having the TV or radio play on low when you’re not at home. If you’re going to be gone a lot of the day, set a time so it cuts on or off as needed. They may not like it on all day, but a little ambient noise can go a long way.

Hire a dog walker

Another great way to keep your dog busy during the quiet days of the school season is by hiring a dog walker. They’ll come check on your pet, give them some TLC and a good walk. This will give them much needed attention and exercise, helping them settled down for a little while until you and the kids return home.

 

Changes in our routines and missing loved ones that are usually there can be stressful for our dogs. That’s why it good to put a little extra effort into keeping them busy during the transition. And don’t forget to call us for dog walking and pet sitting services! We’d love to help keep your dog company when the kids go back to school.

 

 

 

 

Important Items to Bring When Hiking with Your Dog

I don’t know about you, but disconnecting from the world and getting out into nature is one of my favorite things. However much fun it can be, it does have the potential to be dangerous if you’re not prepared. This is even more true if you decided to bring your canine companion with you. Luckily, with a few important items hiking with your dog can be one of the best ways to spend the day.

 

Doggy Backpack

Image result for dog backpack

Hiking with your dog does mean extra supplies, so make them carry their own backpack with an extra leash and other supplies. Make sure not to overload it, the general rule is for the pack to weigh one pound to every 20 lbs of pup.

Collapsible Food and Water Bowls

Image from Amazon

A perfect item for you dog’s backpack is a collapsible bowl set for their food and water. This way no matter where on the trail you are, both of you can take a break for hydration and trail mix.

Paw Protecting Dog Booties

Image from Amazon

If you’re navigating particularly rocky terrain or if your dog is somewhat new to being outside on rough ground you may want to pack a pair of these puppy paw protecting boots. These are also perfect for hot pavement or sand.

 

Heavy Duty Waste Bags

Image from Amazon

The rule of the trail is what you pack in, you pack out. This is the same for waste unless your on a trail that allows you to scoop and bury someone off the main path. Either way packing heavy duty scent eliminating bags is essential. You may also want to bring a compact bag dispenser for them as well.

 

Me & My Dog Medical Kit

Image from Amazon

Bring a first aid kit is a hiking must, but having one made for both you and your dog is helpful and saves space of bringing extra doggy necessities on top of your own first aid kit.

 

Other things to consider

  • Make sure your dog is trained well enough to obey commands while hiking
  • Bring bug spray and sunscreen for both of you (baby/kid friendly products work well for dogs)
  • Update ID’s and/or microchip and bring an extra set of tags if you can
  • Snap a picture of your dog before you head out
  • Make sure their shots are up to date

 

Hiking is blast. But it is more than just fun in the woods, being prepared is key to a successful trip.

What trails do you like to take with your dog? Let us know your favorite trails and hiking with your dog tips!

 

How to Support People Who Have Guide Dogs

 

We’ve all seen and maybe even wondered about guide dogs and the people that need them. As you probably already know, guide dogs are used by visually disabled persons. Whether they are fully blind or have low vision for travel safety, these dogs help them traverse throughout the day. And what they do really is very special. Aside from being a loving companion, they are truly a wonderful mobility tool.

According to Vision Aware, “The guide dog is a “mobility aid” that can enable people who are blind or have low vision to travel safely. Guide dogs can guide people around obstacles and through crowds, stop at curbs and stairs, and sometimes even be trained to find a limited number of objects that are within sight when given orders such as “Find the chair,” “Find the door,” or “Find the elevator.” The guide dog user can also train (or “pattern”) the dog to find frequently used landmarks, such as a bus stop pole or a mailbox (source).”

guide dogs

How to you can help support people with guide dogs:

It is interesting to note that there is an estimated 1.3 million people in the U.S. that are legally blind. And that each year 75,000 more people in the United States will become blind or visually impaired (source). However, there are only approximately 10,000 guide dog teams currently working in the United States. We’ve also learned another statistic that shows only about 2% of all people who are blind and visually impaired have worked with guide dogs.

The reason that percentage is so low isn’t just because people don’t feel them necessary. It is actually quite costly to match a dog. It is Guide Dogs of America‘s mission to match dogs with their perfect blind partner, which costs on average about $48,000. While that seems like a lot think of all of the costs involved. From vaccinations and spaying to training and micro chipping, not to mention boarding, feeding, grooming and the matching services themselves. It takes a lot to make it possible. That’s why donations are always appreciated. Also, learn more about donating here in Colorado with the Canine Partners of the Rockies.

Lending a hand at a local facility is also a great way to help. Centers often need clerical/office assistance, puppy sitting/playing and help with marketing events. The more hands helping, the more the available resources can be used to the fullest of their ability.

  • Be Respectful:

Aside from directly helping, you can help every day by being respectful of guide dogs when you see them. Even though the seem very approachable (and are quite adorable in their vests), they are working. So make sure not to try to give them any special attention, treats or pats on the head.

 


No small act of kindness is too little to help guide dogs and their partners navigate through life. Do you have experience with guide dogs? We’d love to hear your stories in the comments below or on our Facebook page!

 

Anesthesia Free Dental Cleaning – Advice from Wet Noses Pet Sitting

 

You may have heard about a new service being offered to pets- anesthesia free dental cleanings. It is being advertised as a cheaper and safer option to anesthetize cleanings offered from a veterinarian. But is it really safer and worth the money?

Traditional dental cleaning for you dog is similar to what people get done a few times per year. Teeth are scaled and polished, including under the gums, and infected or injured teeth are removed. This is done while the dog is sedated to allow for a more thorough cleaning. It is also less stress for the animal and safety for the vet. These cleanings are done under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian who knows what to do if something goes wrong.

The difference in anesthesia free dental cleaning:

Anesthesia free dental cleanings try to offer a similar service, but with key major differences.

  • Instead of the animal being sedated, the animal is simply restrained. In some cases given a light natural sedative. This is similar to taking your toddler to the dentist and holding him down so that the dentist can clean his teeth. This is really scary and stressful to your pet because they have no idea what is going on. Many pet owners choose anesthesia free dental cleaning because they feel that their animal is too sick or old to get put under, however simply restraining the pet is more stressful and potentially more harmful.
  • Another major issue is that the cleaning is not as thorough. Because the pet is awake, the cleaner cannot reach all the portions of the mouth to do a thorough exam or clean in the back of the mouth or below the gum line. These are the important parts of the teeth to clean since we as pet owners cannot brush them.
  • The third red flag is that the people who preform it are frequently not licensed veterinarians or even vet technicians. This means that if anything goes wrong medically during the procedure, the person preforming it may have no idea what to do or how to save your pet.

dental cleaning

Overall, this procedure is a step in the right direction. It’s important be more aware about pet dental health. However, I feel that the risks of the procedure and the stress it would put on my animals is too great. If you are interested in pursuing the anesthesia free dental cleaning option I encourage you to talk to your vet. Ask them about details to see if your pet is healthy enough or needs the procedure.

What are the Leash Laws in Fort Collins?

 

Do you ever notice dog’s off leash at parks, on trails, or in neighborhoods? Then you start to wonder if they really need to be on a leash? What about the safety of smaller dogs and cats? Why have your dog on a leash if they don’t really need it? Especially if they have excellent voice command skills. And that’s why it is important to be familiar with our state’s leash laws.

Basically, the laws state that all animals need to be in a fenced in area or leashed. But what’s more is that this seems to be an area of great debate in Fort Collins; being as we have tons of trails and natural wildlife area to explore. Some pet owners don’t agree with always having to restrain their pets, especially if they love to spend time outdoors. But parents, home owner associations, dog owners vs. cat owners, all have different opinions.

What’s all the fuss about:

 

  • Owners like their pets to be able to expend energy and explore the wilderness
  • People are worried about wildlife and their own pets (big dogs vs. little dogs, dogs, vs. cats)
  • Destruction of property
  • Safety

No matter how you feel, if your pet is found off leash and deemed “a stray” the following is stated at the Larimer Humane Society:

Even the most responsible pet owners can be accidentally separated from their pets. Each year, Larimer Humane Society receives close to 5,000 stray animals. Licensed pets that wander away from home can be returned to their owner without ever coming to the shelter. Lost pets not in compliance with the local pet license ordinance will be brought to Larimer Humane Society.

If you encounter a stray animal and feel comfortable bringing it into the shelter, please do so. If the animal you encounter is wearing its license tag, you can call Larimer Humane Society and obtain the owner’s contact information to notify the owner that you have their animal.
Impound and boarding fees will apply to pets brought into the shelter. For more information regarding animals at large as it pertains to the Fort Collins municipal code, please visit code section 4-93.

Impound & Boarding Fees
The impound fee for pets wearing their license tag is $40.

The impound fee for licensed pets not wearing their tag and unlicensed pets is $60.
In addition to the impound fee, an additional $15 boarding fee will apply per calendar day.
Stray animals are held for five days, not including the day the animal was impounded. After the five-day waiting period, stray animals become the property of Larimer Humane Society and are evaluated for potential placement in our adoptions program.

Clearly there are a lot of points of view on this matter, but the law stands. So, keep your pets restrained or confined (humanely, that is) because it’s the law. And that’s why even if you don’t agree with it, you could face fines, which no one wants.

 

7 Foods Your Dog Should Never Eat

 

We’re usually careful about what our pets eat during the holidays, but there are things that they can get into all year long. Making sure that your pets are healthy  In fact there are seven foods that your dog should never eat.

1. Alliums

These types of food have been associated with a red blood cell damaging condition, hemolytic anemia. Garlic and onions, plus any food season with them could end up with your pup feeling disoriented, fatigued and listless. Plus, they could suffer rapid heartbeat, darkened urine or vomiting.

2. Spoiled food

I don’t know why some pet owners have fallen into a trap of letting our pets dispose of spoiled food, but we kind of have. But in all truth, if you wouldn’t eat it, then neither should your dog. Especially if it was mold or smells funny, send that old food straight to the trash.

3. Fried foods

There is no doubt that us Americans love our fried food. But extremely fatty food, such as fried chicken is very toxic for our dogs. We have more complex digestive systems that can handle the extra oil and breading, but our pet do not. This can cause pancreatic inflammation that can in turn damage to your dog’s other intestines.

4. Grapes/Raisins

We’re not really sure why that most dogs get sick from eating grapes, but it happens frequently. There is a strong correlation between eating grapes and kidney failure. If your dog has eaten grapes and show signs of diarrhea, vomiting, dehydration, lethargy, or weakness, it’s time to contact the vet.

5. Macadamia nuts

Another mysterious and trouble causing food is macadamia nuts. Luckily this isn’t a big problem because your dog would have to eat a good amount of them to get sick. But if they do it can get serious. Symptoms from eating these nuts include, fever, muscle weakness, depression and vomiting.

6. Salty snacks

If your dog ingests too many salty they could end up with sodium ion poisoning. A chip or two isn’t going to hurt them; but if they get into a whole bag, you need to watch them closely and give them plenty of water. Symptoms include depression, high fever, diarrhea, vomiting,  excessive thirst, kidney damage, and seizures.

7. Xylitol

If you have sugar free foods in your house, check them for this low-calorie sugar substitute. Xylitol is extremely toxic to dogs. If ingested they can cause a drastic spike in insulin levels which can cause dangerously low blood sugar later on. Signs of xylitol poisoning includes vomiting at first, followed by fainting, seizures, weakness, staggering and even death.


If you’re ever concerned about your dog having consumed these foods, call the vet right away. The best way to avoiding accidental poisoning is to keep these foods locked away where your dog can’t reach them.

 

The Problems with Dog Kennels

 

Dog kennels can be a great place to make sure your dog stays safe while you are away on vacation or a business trip. However, there can be some serious dangers when it comes to kennels. There can be exposure to sickness, behavioral problems, and even trauma for dogs who spend too much time in a kennel.

 

Sickness found in Kennels 

Dogs in kennels are at risk for contracting a whole host of diseases and parasites. Respiratory conditions like Kennel Cough, and Canine Distemper, as well as parasites, fleas, ticks and mange, can easily be passed from dog to dog.

 

Behavioral Problems

There is a whole of of stress put on a dog while being kept in a kennel. The strange cage, loud noises, weird smalls can be a lot to take in. Dogs that have been in a shelter for long periods of time exhibit more problems. They can show signs of destructiveness, fearfulness, and tendency to flee. Of course the shorter the dog is in a kennel the less detrimental the effects, but most dogs experience stress on some level when in a kennel.

Kennel Syndrome

When dogs are left in a kennel or a shelter too long,  can actually experience periods of insanity. There was a study done at University of Bristol’s Anthrozoology Institute. It included videotapes of 30 police-trained German shepherds in their kennels after work. They found that the dogs showed definite signs of stress and even temporary mental illness. Keep in mind this is for dogs with jobs and a lot of interaction throughout the day. Imagine how bad it is for dogs that hardly ever get to leave their cages.

It’s likely that short trip to the kennel will not traumatize your dog. However, it’s important to check out a kennel before hand. Also, make sure your dog’s vaccinations are up to date. Lastly, if you’re adopting a dog in from a shelter, be kind and patient as they learn the ropes of life outside of the cage.

Best Collar and Leash to Use for Walking

 

The long sunny and warm days of summer are always inviting. You may find yourself walking your dog more frequently and longer while the sunlight lingers long into the evening hours. Taking your dog for walks is not only healthy, it is a fun way to bond with your pup pal. However, the bonding and fun could be cut short if you’re busy fussing over the wrong sized leash and collar.

At the pet store, the huge aisle of leashes and collars can be pretty confusing. That’s why we have a great list for you to deter the best collar and least to use while walking your dog.

  • Collars & Harnesses:

 

Standard Flat Collar

A standard collar that works for most dogs. It’s important to continue to check the size of the collar as your dog grows or gains/loses weight. You should be able to slip two fingers under the collar comfortably. This is not the best choice for dogs with long or large necks like Greyhounds or Whippets.

Martingale

The Martingale collar adjusts itself when the dog pulls on the leash. It works great for dogs that tend to pull during walks. It tightens just enough that the dog won’t slip out, but doesn’t choke or harm their neck. These are perfect for dogs who tend to get excited by every sight (SQUIRREL!) and sound.

Harness

The harness is perfect for breeds that have pushed in faces Ppugs), trachea issues (Pomeranian), or long slender necks (Italian Greyhounds).  It avoids putting pressure on their necks allowing them to walk more freely. The main draw back is that harnesses can promote pulling in some dogs.

AVOID:

Choke collars and prong/prick collars

  • Leashes:

 

Standard Leash

What is great about the standard leash is that it is also a versatile leash. You can opt for nylon, leather, or chain and they all work about the same. The best thing to remember about this type of leash is to get the right size. If you have a small dog, then a smaller lighter leash will work better than a heavy one. For a dog that chews, try the chain leash. If you walk a lot around dusk or at night, get a nylon leash with a reflection element.

Retractable

Some walkers swear by the retractable leash because it allows the dog to roam freely. However, there are some draw backs. It offers little control, meaning your dog can dart off without much warning, ripping the handle right out of your hand. Even worse, they could get into trouble while on the leash. If there is a dangerous animal, like a snake, in a shrub you won’t be able to pull them back as effectively with a retractable leash.

Slip Lead

 

 

 

 

This is like the Martingale collar, but with a leash attached. It is great for training dogs to stand by your side while you’re walking. The slip allows for safe corrections while still enjoying your walk.

 

 

There are a lot of choices out there when deciding on the best collar and leash you need for your dog. We are always here to help sort out the details. Give us a call if you want to know the type of collar and leash we would recommend for your dog.

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How to Keep Your Pet Safe in the Heat

 

August can be the hottest month of the year. To avoid heat stroke follow these tips and keep your pet safe during the dog days of summer.

Leave your dog at home if you’re running errands

Grabbing your keys can be an instant sign to your dog that it’s time for trip. It’s hard to say no to those pleading eyes, but for safety’s sake, leave them at home. Just a quick trip to the store can turn deadly for a dog left in the car.

As you can see, it does not take much for a car too hot. Even on cool days, it can quickly become dangerous. A simple delay in the store could be all it takes.

Limit exercise and outings on extremely hot days

You don’t have to be a hermit in the AC during the summer months, but it’s good to limit your dogs time outside. Some dogs can’t help but run and jump. When the temperature is rising, this could spell trouble and cause them to overheat. Taking care to limit the time they have in the sun will help stop overheating before it starts.

Avoid parks with a lot of asphalt

Enjoying a sunny day is great. When you take your dog out, avoid parks with tracks or lots of asphalt. Choose shady parks with dirt paths. The asphalt is hot and can easily burn their pads. You can also get some Dog Booties to protect their feet from hot roads and sand.

When you do go out bring plenty of water

Take a travel water bowl for your dog and plenty of water. To keep water cool on a hot day, fill up the bottle half way. Put the bottle on its side in the freezer. This will freeze the water on one side of the bottle, basically making a giant ice cube. Fill up the other side with water and you’ll have ice cold water for hours.

We are always here to help you if you need a pet sitter or dog walker during the day. Make sure to contact us! Your pets safety is our priority.